Mar 06

Tombstone Tuesday: Ball Creek Baptist Church, Part II

This series of images of grave markers for veterans buried in the Ball Creek Baptist Church is continued from Tombstone Tuesday on the 28th of February.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All rights reserved.

Feb 28

Tombstone Tuesday: Ball Creek Baptist Church, Part I

Ball Creek Baptist Church, established in 1857, is located on Ga. Rt. 136 just woest of Keetor Road. A marble marker at the steps leading up to the cemetery reads:

“Ball Creek Church, Organized Aug. 5, 1857

Names of Presbytery: R. Jorden, James Underwood, John Holden

Names of Charter Members: A.K. Trible, John Langley, William Dover, Ealija Carrell (males; Maranda Allen, Elizabeth Dooley, Elizabeth Carrell, Delilia Collins, Jilley Underwood, Nancy Bracket, Dina a Blackwomen (females)”

Many veterans are interred herein. This is part of a series with photographs of headstones of the vets.


 

© Linda Woodward Geiger

Feb 21

Tombstone Tuesday: Arbor Hill Baptist Church

Arbor Hill Baptist Church is located on Fortner Road near Harrington (west of Four Mile Baptist Church) in Pickens County, Georgia.

Images here indicate some of the U.S. Veterans that are buried there.

 

 

© Photographs are the property of Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

 

Jan 17

Tombstone Tuesday: Veterans, Antioch Church, Pickens Co.

 

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

Jan 16

New Echota: Teacakes in the Cabin

 

 

Plan to visit the New Echota State Historic Site on Saturday, January 28, 2012, 10 am to 4 pm when the Friends of New Echota (FONE) hosts TEACAKES IN THE CABIN in the Cherokee Middle-class Cabin.  You’ll enjoy sweet treats, hot beverages, historic demonstrations, and old-fashioned games for the kids. The cabin will be warm and cozy, the site and nature trail will be open for touring, and our 17-minute movie, The Cherokee Nation: The Story of New Echota, will be shown in the theater throughout the day. Come and join us for this special gathering and enjoy the beauty of the winter landscape.

 

Standard admission fees of $4.50-$6.50 allow access to the Cherokee Middle-class Cabin, museum, film, historic grounds, and nature trail. New Echota State Historic Site attracts almost 10,000 visitors annually, including hundreds of students of all ages from area public and private schools. The site is located one mile east of 1-75, exit 317, on GA Hwy. 225N.  Friends of New Echota is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit organization operating as a chapter of Friends of Georgia State Parks and Historic Sites. For more information, call 706-624-1321 or visit www.gastateparks.org.

 

Oct 22

Dahlonega Gold Museum State Historic Site

The first courthouse in Lumpkin County was a log structure that stood in the vicinity of the present day village square in Dahlonega. In February 1834, John Humphries agreed to build the courthouse for two thousand dollars. The two-story brick building was completed in 1836.  Lumpkin County sold the courthouse to the state of Georgia in 1966 and the state spent a sizeable sum to refurbish and stabilize the structure. Today the building serves as the Dahlonega Gold Museum State Historic Site and is, reportedly, the oldest surviving county courthouse in Georgia.

 

What is now Lumpkin County was part of the Cherokee Nation and the area in which gold was discovered. The gold was one of the reasons that the State of Georgia was behind the Indian Removal Act of the federal government in 1830. When Gold was discovered in these hills in 1829, white intruders entered the Cherokee Nation—The first major gold rush in the United States. The first gold strike is attributed to Benjamin Parks, a white intruder, in 1828/1829.

The Dahlonega Gold Museum State Historic Site is a wonderful place to learn more about the North Georgia Gold Rush. The museum is chock-a-block full of delightful exhibits. A small fee is charged for admission (group rates are available with advance notice). Current house are Monday-Saturday, 9am–5pm, and Sunday, 10am–5pm.

For additional information on the Georgia Gold Rush see:
1.  Williams, David. The Georgia Gold Rush: Twenty-Niners, Cherokees, and Gold Fever. Columbia, South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press, 1993.
2.  Cain, Andrew W. History of Lumpkin County for the First Hundred Years, 1832–1932. Atlanta, Georgia: Stein Printing Company, 1932.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

Oct 19

Wordless Wednesday: Chief Vann House

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All rights Reserved

 

Oct 07

Family Recipe Friday: No. Ga. JAY Food, Part 4

The following come of Joe Bailey’s manuscript, North Georgia JAY Food? It’s Growing, Harvesting, Preparation and Other Interesting Stuff with his permission.

HOG KILLIN TIME – FRESH PORK SAUSAGE, TENDERLOIN, SHOULDERS, LIVER PUDDIN (MUSH), SOUSE (PRESS) MEAT, BRAINS AND SALT CURED COUNTRY HAM. 

All this good stuff starts off with a 300 lb. hog that lives in a hog pen several hundred yards from the main house (so the smell does not get to the house unless the wind comes from the wrong direction). The hog is fed 2 times a day in a wooden trough in the hog pen. The hog feed is called “slop” and consists of water soaked corn and the scraps from the household meals collected in the “slop bucket” which sits on the floor in the kitchen next to the stove. When it is time to “slop the hogs” you get the slop bucket and carry it to the corn crib, pour a couple of cups of soaked corn into the slop bucket and go across the road to call the hogs. The hogs at “Mammas” had about a 4 or 5 acre wooded pen to stay in where they could forage for acorns and roots between meals. If they were not at the pen when feeding time came you had to call them up. The call was “Soo-wee, Soo-wee, Pig, Pig, Pig, Soo-wee, Soo-wee” repeated several times in a high pitched voice. I used to love calling the hogs. By the way, this “Slop Bucket” is not to be confused with the “Slop Jar” which resided under the bed in cold weather so the occupants of the house did not have to venture out into the cold to relieve themselves in the “out house”.

The next step to having all the good eatin things about a hog was the “Hog Killin”. This event usually took place “when the moon was right” in either October, November or December and the temperature was expected to be in the 20’s, 30’s or 40’s (Uncle Charlie could always tell when this was going to happen). He would take his bolt action, single shot 22 rifle to the hog pen about 6:00AM on the selected morning when all the signs looked right and shoot the hog he wanted from the two or three in the pen just behind the ear. He would then bring up the team of mules connected to a double tree, knock out several planks in the hog pen and connect the hind feet of the dead hog to the doubletree with a chain. The mules would drag the hog down the road a little piece to a 100 gallon iron pot with boiling water in it. Here the hog was raised above the pot with a block and tackle and dipped into the boiling water to help release the hair from the body of the hog. After removal from the pot large knives were used to scrape the hair from the hog. It would take several dippings in the hot water to get all the hair off the hog. Then the dehaired hog was transported to a large table that had been constructed of saw horses and boards in the yard. The hog was laid on this table and several people (neighbors, relatives, etc.) set upon the hog with knives, saws and axes cutting the hog into the various parts such as hams, shoulders ribs, etc.

The liver was cooked and mixed with an equal amount of cooked pork meat (chops are fine). Then the mixture is ground together with salt and pepper and sage. Add some of the reserved grease from the pork chop frying and mold into a container and refrigerated overnight. We called it Liver pudding 

Contact the Author

Mr. Bailey would like to hear from anyone about their memories of any foods they think may have been passed down from their Jay Ancestors. Just send me a message at linda @ lindageiger.com and I’ll see that Mr. Bailey gets the message.

Joe Bailey owns the copyright for this story and the three images in this post. Please respect his copyright.

Sep 30

Family Recipe Friday: No. Ga. JAY Food, Part 3

The following come of Joe Bailey’s manuscript, North Georgia JAY Food? It’s Growing, Harvesting, Preparation and Other Interesting Stuff with his permission.

Another good dish I can remember is FRIED SQUIRREL OR RABBIT. I used to contribute to this meal when I visited “Mamma and Uncle Charlie” in the 1950’s and 1960’s. I would go hunting in the fields and woods around the home place and kill squirrels and rabbits, bring them to the house and skin them for Mamma. She would cut them up flour them and fry them in HLG. This was a good meal to have with Hoe Cake and Fried Potatoes and Onions.

FRUIT PIES – FRIED OR COBBLER. My favorite was “Huckleberry”. Huckleberries grow wild on a bush about 12” – 18” off the ground. The berries are deep blue when ripe and get to be about ¼” in diameter. They are not as large as blueberries, and due to the small bush they grow on, is a lot of backbreaking work to get enough for a pie. They, just like blackberries, always grow in a place that has lots of “chiggers”. Lamp oil soaked rags tied around ones ankles and wrists are supposed to provide protection against chiggers, but, I always seemed to get them picking berries. Mamma made other good fruit pies from wild blackberries, raspberries grown next to the chimneys of the house, fresh apples and peaches and apples and peaches dried in the sun on pieces of tin roofing in the garden.

Contact the Author

Mr. Bailey would like to hear from anyone about their memories of any foods they think may have been passed down from their Jay Ancestors. Just send me a message at linda @ lindageiger.com and I’ll see that Mr. Bailey gets the message.

Joe Bailey owns the copyright for this story and the three images in this post. Please respect his copyright.

Sep 23

Family Recipe Friday: No. Ga. JAY Food, Part 2

The following come of Joe Bailey’s manuscript, North Georgia JAY Food? It’s Growing, Harvesting, Preparation and Other Interesting Stuff with his permission.

The first food that comes to my mind is “Mamma’s” FRIED POTATOES AND ONIONS. I have had this dish many times, cooked in a black iron skillet on a wood stove, in Dawson County, GA on the War Hill Rd. It consists of 3 – 4 Irish potatoes cut up into ¼” – ½” cubes. The cubes are dropped into about a ½” of hot “hog lard grease” (HLG) and fried until they are about ½ done. Then you add 1 – 2 cups of coarsely chopped onions and cook until the onions and potatoes are done. Turn out onto a paper towel to soak up the grease (I don’t believe Mamma ever did this). These are better than “Waffle House” scattered and smothered”.

HOE CAKE. This is biscuit dough that was never made into biscuits. You make biscuit dough and shape it into something resembling a big pancake. This is placed in a black iron skillet with a light coating of HLG and baked in the oven till done. This is served on a platter and everyone picks up the hoe cake and “tears him off a piece the size he wants”.

Contact the Author

Mr. Bailey would like to hear from anyone about their memories of any foods they think may have been passed down from their Jay Ancestors. Just send me a message at linda @ lindageiger.com and I’ll see that Mr. Bailey gets the message.

Joe Bailey owns the copyright for this story and the three images in this post. Please respect his copyright.

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