Feb 25

George Disney’s Grave

155-016

High up on Roky Face. S. of gap. is the lone grave of English-born George Disney. Co. K., 4th Ky. Inft., Lewis’ “Orphan Brigade”. Bate’s div., Hindman’s Corps [C.S.A].

The 4th Ky. was deployed to form a living telegraph line from base to summit of the ridge at the point where the view commanded Federal movements in open valley N.W. Disney, atop the ridge, was killed by a random bullet, Feb. 25, 1864; he was buried where he fell.

Dalton Boy Scouts, on a hike, found the grave, & directed by Scout Master Wm. M. Sapp, Sr., replaced the inscribed heart – pine board with a marble marker, May 13, 1912.

GHM 155-16, 1954
Located on US 41 about 1/2 mile north of Tibbs Road, Whitfield County
Photographed by Linda Woodward Geiger

Note: The next GHM (chronologically speaking) for activity in 1964 does not occur until May. These blog posts will resume on May 2nd, 2014.

 

Feb 25

Mill Creek Gap

GHM 155-13

Otherwise known as Buzzard Roost. This natural gateway through Rocky Face Ridge was heavily fortified by Confederate forces at Dalton, after their retreat from Missionary Ridge.

February 25, 1864, the Federal 14th A.C., Dept. of the Cumberland, moving by Tunnel Hill, attempted to seize the gap, but were driven back y Stewart’s & Breckinridge’s divs. At the same time, the gap was assailed from Crow Valley, E. of Rocky Face, by Cruft’s & Baird’s divs. which were repulsed by Hindman’s A.C.

These Federal moves were prompted by rumors that Johnston’s command had reinforced Polk facing Sherman’s forces at Meridian, Miss.

GHM 155-013, 1987
Location: Old US 41 (gravel road off Tibbs Road), Whitfield County
Photographed by Linda Woodward Geiger

Feb 25

Crow Valley

155-021

 

Feb. 25, 1864. Federal forces moved S. on this rd. in an attempt to outflank the Confederate defenders at Mill Creek Capt, which was being threatened by 2 Fed. divs. from the W. These movements were to test the strength of Johnston’s army at Dalton, said to have been depleted by a shift of Hardee’s A.C. to Mississippi. All Federal attacks failed.

Troops in this area were Cruft’s div., 4th A.C., Baird’s div., 14th A.C., & Long’s cavaltry.

5 landmarks of the Feb. operations in Crow Valley, still survive: the Crow house, opp. this marker; the Davis house 500 ft. n., the Burke house, spring & log barn, 2 mi. N.E.

GHM155-21, 1954
Location: Intersection of Reed Pond Road and Crow Valley Road, Whitfield County
Photographed 6/16/1994 by Linda Woodward Geiger

Feb 24

Military Operations in Crow Valley

155-023

There were 2 demonstrations by Federal forces on Dalton, in 1864: Feb 24-26; May 7-12. On these over-lapping fields of operations, the Burke house & spring were noted landmarks.

Feb. 25, Cruft’s & Baird’s divs. (rth & 14th A.C.), via the low ridge W., moved to outflank the Confederates at Mil Creek Gap, but were forced back. May 9, 2 divs., Schofield’s 23d A.C., were halted at S. end of ridge, by Stevenson’s div., Hood’s A.C., & the artillery at Potato Hill.

The log barn at the Burke house was used as a hospital by Surg. S.C. Menzies, Med. Director, Cruft’s div., 4th A.C.,Feb. 25.

GHM #155-23, 1954.
Located: Reed Road, Whitfield County
Photographed 6/16/1994 by Linda Woodward Geiger.

Feb 24

Georgia Historical Markers: An Introduction

During the 1950s the state of Georgia established a Historic Commission. One of their tasks was to  research, prepare text, and designate site locations for historical markers that would be erected throughout Georgia’s highways and byways. During the 1950s and 1960s, the Commission erected markers relating to county seats, early highways, historic home, the Revolutionary War, and the Civil War (to name but a few). Many of the records of the Historic Commission can be located at the Georgia Archives in Morrow, Georgia, Record Group 61.

Later the Georgia Department of Natural Resources over-saw the historical marker program and today new markers are the responsibility of the Georgia Historical Society.

Because of my late husband’s keen interest in the Civil War, he and I set spent many days traveling thousands of miles within the state of Georgia. Our mission was to locate as many of the markers that were erected to commemorate the military actives in Georgia during the Civil War (including cemeteries, forts, arsenals, roads, forts and entrenchments). During out quest we located and photographed over a thousand Georgia Historical Markers.

The Atlanta Campaign portion of the Civil War occurred in 1864. Here were are 150 years later and I’d like to share some that that history as represented on the historical markers with you. I would be remiss if I did not tell my readers that the markers were not always accurate. However, I’m posting photographs and transcribing the text in the exact words that appear on the markers. I will not correct or point out errors.

Using this blog as a vehicle, I plan to provide a chronology of Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

Oct 15

Tombstone Tuesday: Marker of Charles Dillard Mullinax & Martha Taylor

DSC01723_MullinaxDSC01734_Mullinax

The cemetery plot in which Charles Dillard Mullinax and his wife Martha Taylor are buried contains an interesting and informative cement slab—the names with relationships of many of the Mullinax kin:

Charles Dillard Mullinax

Father’s side

Father: Marion Mullinax

Grandparents: D.W. Mullinax and Minerva Caylor

Great Grandparents: Frank Mullinax & Cynthia Childers

Great Great Grandparents: David Caylor and Pamela Craig

Mother’s side

Mother: Webbie Mullins

Grandparents: Charlie Mullins & Lou Harris

Great Grandparents: Webb Mullins & Elizabeth Dunigan

Great Great Grandparents: Jim Harris & Cordelia Moss

Great Uncles & Aunts

Luck Mullins, Jane Mullins, Skid Harris, Pluma Harris, Ben Mullinax, Bob Mullinax, Jim Mullinax, France & Matt Mullinax, Wesley Caylor, Mandy Fountain, Sarah Fowler, and Cordelia Ingram

Uncles & Aunts – Father’s Side By Age

Hiram Mullinax

Catherine Thomason

Luther Mullinax

Amanda Smith

Ella Smith

Vista Sweney

Julia Ingram

Uncles & Aunts – Mother’s Side By Age

Effie Poole

Alama Mullinax

Webbie Mullinax

Enos Mullins

Eunice Caylor

Brothers and Sisters by Age

Dillard & Seaborn

Grace Taylor

Elsie Eaton

Ruthelle Wooten

Bertha Mullinax

D.W. & Delmar

Children by Age

Shirley Fowler – Johnny Mullinax

Judy Mullinax – Karen Cantrell

Grand Children by Age

Jennifer & Mellisa Mullinax

Amanda Cantrell

Great Grand Children by Age

Amberly & Joshua Richards

Martha Mullinax

Father: Charlie Taylor

Mother: Roxie McMillen

Brothers and Sisters By Age

Clayton Taylor

Robert Taylor

Martha Mullinax

Bertie Daley

Charles and Martha Mullinax (married 16 February 1946 in Mobile Alabama) are buried at Pleasant Hill Baptist Church in Pickens County, Georgia.

The plot and markers were viewed and photographed by the author on 6 May 2002.

Linda Woodward Geiger. All rights reserved.

Oct 04

Nuisance Wildlife in These Mountains

The North Georgia Mountains seem to be having an increasing problem with co-habitation of humans and wildlife. It seems to me that many of the humans in my community are imbecilic. It doesn’t take a genius to realize that wildlife is frequently attracted to human garbage.

Black BearMy home is in the North Georgia Mountains in the eastern section of Pickens County near the Dawson County line. Several mornings during the last month, bears as well as raccoons have ransacked trashcans. It has been reported that the substantial trashcan outside the entrance to the fitness center weights about 200 pounds yet it has been knocked over and its contents examined for food. Some of our residents dispose of their beverage containers and food waste in public trashcans outside of the mail facility, fitness center, etc., instead of disposing of it with their other household trash. If we can’t train the residents, then the community leaders should eliminate the trashcans.

Feral PigOur community has, also seen an influx of the feral hogs recently. Various traps have been set to help coral them and remove them from the community. These menacing tusked intruders can be grow to be as large as 400 pounds and have large litters of piglets. A recent notice was sent out indicating that images of some residents visiting the trapping area have been captured on camera. Come-on folks! You are jeopardizing the capture process and are also putting yourselves in danger.

A news report within the last week also indicates that the feral pigs have been seen in some of the Atlanta suburbs and not just the North Georgia Mountains.

Oct 02

Dahlonega Gold Museum

With the furlough and shut down of National Parks, perhaps more people will take the opportunity to visit state run museums and Parks.

Dahlonega_1013The old courthouse, constructed in 1836, on the square in Dahlonega (Lumpkin County) is a state historic site housing the Dahlonega Gold Museum.

Hours:

Monday through Saturday, 9 am to 5 pm
Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm

Admission:

$ 6.00, Adults
$ 5.50, Seniors (62+)
$ 3.50, Youth (6–17)
$ 1.00, Child (under 6)

Driving Directions

The first gold rush[1] in the United States was located in this area of the North Georgia Mountains near the current ghost town of Auraria (you can guess why they community was named Auraria, can’t you) not far from Dahlonega

If you want to learn about the 1829 Gold Rush, I suggest that you visit the Dahlonega Gold Musuem and, also, that you read David Williams book, The Georgia Gold Rush: Twenty-Niners, Cherokees, and Gold Fever [University of South Carolina Press, 1993]. You can also download a PDF copy of a Coulter’s Auraria: The Story of a Georgia Gold-Mining Town [University of Georgia Press, 1956].

On Monday, I took a friend from the UK to visit the Dahlonega Gold Museum.

Part of a stamping machine

Part of a stamping machine

Dahlonega_1006

Display of tools usded in a placer mine

Safe used by Lumpkin County Superior Court from 1886-1965

2,500 lb. safe used by Lumpkin County Superior Court from 1886-1965

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Following our museum visit we had lunch on the square and then headed off to visit the only working gold mine in the area and to try our hand at panning for gold. Below are a few images of some of the old equipment used in mining process.

Dahlonega_1031 Dahlonega_1028 Dahlonega_1027 Mining Equipment at The Crisson Mine Dahlonega_1022 Dahlonega_1023

What a wonderful day!

 

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

 


[1] Some will argue that the first gold rush was actually in area of Villa Rica in present day Carroll County, Georgia.

Aug 01

The 8th Regiment Band, Georgia Volunteer Infantry

The Eighth Regiment Band.

The Eighth Regiment Band

History is brought to life by the present day volunteer musicians who make up The 8th Regiment Band, Georgia Volunteer Infantry. 1st Lt. John Carruth, conductor of the Rome Symphony Orchestra, was instrumental in the formation of “The 8th” in 1986.

Allegedly, “The 8th” was the largest Georgia band and was the first to go to the Army of Northern Virginia. Historically “The 8th” served from the 1st Manassas in 1861 to Appomattox in 1865. The 8th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry was comprised of three companies from Rome (Floyd County), Georgia. The band’s first Chief Musician was G.G. Merck who volunteered at Rome. Their music scores are arranged from original period pieces and some of the volunteer members play authentic instruments from the Civil War period.

The modern “8th” (as they are frequently called) are regularly featured at a myriad of Civil War re-enactments including Gettysburg, Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Resaca. During the re-enactments the band may represent either the Confederacy or Union bands. In addition, they perform at other types of military re-enactments, balls, concerts, memorial services, etc. They have also produced several music CDs and have been featured in several movies and the multimedia show at Chickamauga Battlefield Park.

You may learn more about “the 8th” (including where to they will be appearing and how to purchase their products) by visiting their website at http://eighthregimentband.com/.

Photography  courtesy of “The 8th.”

 

© Linda Woodward Geiger.

Jul 18

Leave a Note in the Grave Yard

Grave Marker of Thomas Nicholsonscan0121This marker for the burial of Thomas Nicholson (about 1800–Dec. 24, 1890) is located in the Talona Baptist Church Cemetery in Whitestone, Georgia, on the Gilmer and Pickens County Line.

Eyes are immediately drawn to the wooden stack with the lamented note left by “…Patsy Payne Hall, the great great granddaughter of Thomas and Susanna (Susan) Nicholson…” In the note Pat described her relationship to Thomas Nicholson, provided her mailing address, her telephone number, and an e-mail address. Pat had a great idea for locating other folks who are also descendants (or researching) this Nicholson family.

Photographs taken by the author of this blog, 14 May 2002.

 

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