Tag Archive: Daniel Gale

Sep 04

52 Ancestors, Week #34: Daniel Gale of Kingston & Gilmanton, N.H.

Daniel Gale (1767-1829) was my third great grandfather who removed from Kingston, Rockingham County, New Hampshire as a young adult and settled in Gilmanton, Strafford County.[1]

Daniel Gale. Born on 28 March 1767 in Kingston, son of Capt. Daniel Gale and Patience Eastman; [2] and died in Gilmanton, on 26 March 1829.[3]

On 5 August 1790 Daniel married Dolly Smith, daughter of Dr. William Smith & Betsey Batchelder, in the Smith Meeting House, Gilmanton. Dolly was born on 17 January 1764;[4] and died in Gilmanton on 10 February 1853.

They had the following children:

  1. Betsey. Born in Gilmanton; married Samuel Smith; and died on 11 Dec 1884 in Gilmanton, Belknap County, New Hampshire.8
  2. Susannah. Born in Gilmanton; married Francis Ayer in Belmont, Strafford County on 3 February 1824.9

iii.      Ebenezer. Born in Gilmanton, and married a woman called Catharine.

  1. Dorothy “Dolly” Gale. Born in Gilmanton, Belknap County, New Hampshire.
  2. Robert Smith Gale. Born in 1804 in Gilmanton; died on 16 January 1894;[5] and was buried at Smith Meeting House. [6] He married Betsey Peaslee who died on 24 November 1870 and was buried at Smith Meeting House.[7] Robert and Betsy had at four known children: George A. Gale, Daniel Edwin Gale, Laura A. Gale, and Martha J. Gale.
  3. William Smith. Born on 24 December 1790 in Gilmanton.10

vii.      Daniel C. Gale. He married a woman called Mary Ellen (surname unknown). They had one child, Mary Gale.

viii.      Eliphalet Gale. Born on 16 December 1806;[8] and died 16 April 1891[9]. For additional information please see 52 Ancestors, 52 Weeks, #24 Eliphalet Gale.

Daniel wrote his will on 23 March 1829 just a few days before his death. In the will he made the following bequeaths:[10]

  1. “…to my beloved Wife Dolly Gale the one half of all the dwelling house that I now live in, in Gilmanton … meaning the east front room and equal to one half of the kitchen to do her washing in also for baking in the oven and other house work usually done in a kitchen also one third part of the Cellar with the privilege to pass to and from the same also one half of the chamber that is in the east end of the house with a privilege to pass to and from the same where they are now used _ also one half of the front entry also a privilege to the well for water and a privilege in the door yards to keep wood in also to be paid her yearly ten bushels of Indian corn and five bushels of wheat and fifteen bushels of potatoes and garden same as she may need for her own use and one hog for her Pork also two Cows and two sheep to be furnished and kept for her own use and benefit also wood hauled to the door sufficient to keep one fire also the use of a horse and sleigh by winter and wagon by summer to visit friends also all the household furniture that may be in the house at my decease to be at her disposal at her decease to be performed by my Executors hereafter named during her natural life.”
  2. “…to my son William Smith Gale five dollars and no more he having received his share before”
  3. “…to my daughters Betsey Smith Gale fifty Dollars in money to be paid her by my executors in six months after my decease also a privilege in my dwelling house that is one half of the west front room also a privilege in the oven to bake and one sixth part of the Cellar and a privilege to go to and from the same through the kitchen and one quarter part of the front entry which privileges are to remain until she may marry and no Longer.”
  4. ”… my son Daniel Gale one quarter part of a forty acre lot in Gilmanton in said County being lot numbered thirty one in the second range of forty acre lots in said Town in common undivided to him and his heirs and assigns forever.”
  5. “… my son Ebenezer Gale one quarter part of a forty acre lot in said Town and County being lot numbered thirty one in the second range of forty acre lots in said Town in common undivided to him and his heirs and assigns forever.”
  6. “… my daughter Susanna Ayres sixteen Dollars in money to be paid her in six months after my decease by my Executors…”
  7. “… my daughter Dorothy Gale fifty Dollars in money to be paid her by my Executors in six months after my decease also a privilege in my dwelling house that is the one half of the west front room also a privilege in the oven to bake bread and one sixth part of the Cellar and a privilege to go to and from the same through the kitchen and one quarter part of the front entry which privileges to remain until she shall Marry and no longer.”
  8. “… to my sons Robert Smith Gale and Eliphalet Gale all the rest residue and remainder of my real Estate situate in Gilmanton aforesaid together will [with] all my Personal Estate remaining after payment of all my Just debts they paying, and complying with all the legacies as above described to have and to hold the same to them and their heirs and assigns forever.”

Witness to the will (proven on16 April 1829 in Sanbornton) were Peter Judkins, John Nelson and Abraham Parsons Jr.

Smith Meeting House Cemetery Gilmanton, New HampshireDaniel and Dolly (Smith) Gale were buried in the Smith Meeting House Cemetery, Gilmanton, Belknap County, New Hampshire.[11]

Future Research

From Daniel’s will we know that he owned 40 acres in Gilmanton and also his residence. It is unclear if the residence was upon the 40 acres or if Daniel had two separate parcels. When he died in 1829 the land would have been located in Strafford County, New Hampshire. It would be beneficial to search the Strafford County Deeds.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved

Notes

[1] The town of Gilmanton was established as part of Strafford County, New Hampshire, but in 1840, it became a part of Belknap County which was created from Strafford County.

[2] James Otis Lyford, History of the Town of Canterbury, New Hampshire, 1727-1912, 2 volumes (Concord, New Hampshire: The Rumford Press, 1912), II: 155. Hereinafter cited as History of the Town of Canterbury.

[3] Tombstone of Daniel Gale and Dolly, his wife, Smith Meeting House Cemetery, Gilmanton, New Hampshire (Route 107 to Smith Meetinghouse Road, part of which is a dirt road), viewed and photographed by Linda Woodward Geiger, September 1991. Hereinafter cited as Tombstone of Daniel Gale and Dolly, his wife.

[4] History of the Town of Canterbury, II: 155.

[5] Tombstone of Robert S. Gale, Smith Meeting House Cemetery, Gilmanton, New Hampshire (Route 107 to Smith Meetinghouse Road, part of which is a dirt road), viewed and photographed by Linda Woodward Geiger, September 1991. Hereafter cited as Tombstone of Robert S. Gale.

[6] Tombstone of Robert S. Gale.

[7] Tombstone of Betsey, wife of R.S. Gale, Smith Meeting House Cemetery, Gilmanton, New Hampshire (Route 107 to Smith Meetinghouse Road, part of which is a dirt road), viewed and photographed by Linda Woodward Geiger, September 1991.

[8] History of the Town of Canterbury, II: 156..

[9] Obituary of Eliphalet Gale, Rays of Light Penacook, New Hampshire, 23 April 1891.

[10] Will of Daniel Gale, Strafford County, New Hampshire, Probate Records, 1828–1830, Volume 39:240–243; Family History Library microfilm 16,489.

[11] Tombstone of Daniel Gale and Dolly, his wife, Smith Meeting House Cemetery, Gilmanton, New Hampshire (Route 107 to Smith Meetinghouse Road, part of which is a dirt road), viewed and photographed by Linda Woodward Geiger, September 1991.

 

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