Nov 27

Seaver’s Saturday Night Challenge

The government structure of New England is unlike that of much of the United States. In that vain, I’ve taken a slight twist on Randy Seaver’s  “Saturday Night Fun Challenge” using Randy Majors’ website, http://randymajors.com/p/maps.html. My focus is on the town of Loudon, New Hampshire, rather than on Merrimack County within which Loudon, now lies.

Province of New Hampshire (now one of New England’s six states): On 18 September 1679, King Charles II made New Hampshire a royal colony separate from Massachusetts, but did not stipulate a western limit to its borders.[1]

New Hampshire Vermont Atlas of Historical County Boundaries*

Historical U.S. County Boundary Maps

1770 Effective Saturday, April 29, 1769, ROCKINGHAM created as one of five original counties

1773 Loudon in the province of New Hampshire
The first settlement was begun in 1761. Loudon, formerly a part of Canterbury, was incorporated on 28 January 1773,[2] and was within the jurisdiction of Rockingham County.

1780 Loudon, Rockingham County

1790 Loudon, Rockingham County

1800 Loudon, Rockingham County

1810 Loudon, Rockingham County

1820 Loudon, Rockingham County

1825 Effective 1 August 1823, Merrimack County was created from Hillsborough and Rockingham Counties.[3]

1830 Effective 24 December 1828, Merrimack County gained some area from Strafford when the town of Franklin was created from the towns of Andover, Northfield, Salisbury, and Sanbornton.

1830 Loudon, Merrimack County

1840 Loudon, Merrimack County

1850 Loudon, Merrimack County

1860 Loudon, Merrimack County

1870 Loudon, Merrimack County

1880 Loudon, Merrimack County

1890 Loudon, Merrimack County

1900 Loudon, Merrimack County

How do these boundaries affect my research?

Since vital records are under the jurisdiction of the town in New Hampshire, in addition to looking for records of births, marriage, and deaths for families know to have resided early in Loudon, I need to look at the records of Canterbury, since Loudon was formed from lands formerly in the town of Canterbury.

For probate and deed records for the families living in Loudon, prior to the formation of Merrimack County in December 1828, I need to look for the records in the county of Rockingham.


[1] T.J. Rand, coordinator of “Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire,” NHGenWeb page http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nhmerrim/Loudon/ viewed 26 November 2011.

[2] Marcia D. Melnyk, Genealogist’s Handbook for New England Research, 4th edition (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), 150.

[3] Randy Majors, “Historical U.S. County Boundary Maps, ”http://randymajors.com/p/maps.html, viewed 26 November 2011.

* John H. Long, editor, New Hampshire Vermont Atlas of Historical County Boundaries (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993).  [A project of the Dr. William M. Scholl Center for Family and Community History: The Newberry Library.]

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=368

Nov 27

Scrapbooking Sunday: Brown Family Heirloom

The note found in one of the drawers within this desk reads:

The living know that they must die,
But all the dust forgotten lie;
Their memory and their sense is gone,
Alike unknowing and unknown.
Then what my thought Design to do,
My hands with all your might pursue
Like no Device nor work is found,
_or faille nor hope beneath the ground

For Value received I promise
Alfred H. Brown my Desk at
My decease
Elizabeth Goddard

Alfred H. Brown, born, 14 July 1838, in New Ipswich, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, son of  Hermon Brown and Sophronia Prescott.[1] Sophronia Prescott was born 11 December 1802 in Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, daughter of Samuel Potter Prescott and Elisabeth Brown.[2]

 

Elisabeth Brown, maternal grandmother of Alfred H. Brown, was born 28 February 1779, in Concord, daughter of Elizabeth Brown and Lieut. Samuel Brown.[3] She married, 1st, Samuel Potter Prescott on 7 June 1798 in Concord;[4] and 2nd. Asa Raymond, and 3rd, Rev. David Goddard, 30 Jun 1846 in New Ipswich.[5]

Alfred H. Brown was my great grandfather.


[1] Death certificate of Alfred H. Brown, Bureau of Vital Statistics, State of New Hampshire, Hazen Road, Concord, New Hampshire; and Charles Henry Chandler, The History of New Ipswich, New Hampshire 1735–1914, with Genealogical Records of the Principal Families (Fitchburg, Massachusetts: Sentinel Printing Company, 1914), 276 (hereinafter cited as History of New Ipswich).

[2] Vital Records of Concord, Massachusetts, Birth, Marriages, and Deaths, 1635–1850 (photocopy of 1891 edition, Boston (hereinafter cited as Vital Records of Concord): New England Historical and Genealogical Society, 1986), 94; and William Prescott, The Prescott Memorial: Or a Genealogical Memoir of the Prescott Families of America (Boston: Henry W. Dutton & Son, 1870), 120 (hereinafter cited as The Prescott Memorial).

[3] Vital Records of Concord, 247; and Charles Edward Potter, Genealogies of Some Old Families of Concord, Mass., and Their Descendants in Part to the Present Generation (Boston: Alfred Mudge & Son, Printers, 1887), 64 (hereinafter cited as Some Old Families of Concord).

[4] Vital Records of Concord, 362; and Some Old Families of Concord, 64.Asa

[5] Town Clerk, Vital Records of New Ipswich, New Hampshire (New Ipswich, New Hampshire: typescript), n.d.), Family History Library microfilm #15,568.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All rights Reserved.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=357

Nov 21

Matrilineal Monday

One of the down sides of accepting client commissions as a professional genealogist (I’m proud to have been an associate of the Board of Certification of Genealogists for over fifteen years) is that we sometimes spend so much time conducting research on families of others, we rarely accomplish much research on our own families.

When I recently decided to write a blog on my matrilineal line, I was somewhat surprised to see that I’ve conducted very little original research on these lines. The brief ahnentafel of my matrilineal line will illustrate just that.

3. Josephine Emma Perkins. Born on 30 Dec 1917 in Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[1] Josephine Emma died in York Harbor, York County, Maine, on 2 Jan 1993, at the age of 75.[2] Memorial services were held on 5 January 1993 in Concord, New Hampshire. Josephine was buried in the family plot (Plot FF 2 Grave), Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.

On 21 Sep 1940 she married Oscar Herman Woodward  Jr. in Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[3]

7. Alice Margaret Brown. Born on 20 Feb 1886 in Canterbury, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[4] Alice Margaret died in Westmoreland, Cheshire County, New Hampshire, on 4 Jun 1983; she was 97.[5] Buried on 9 Jul 1983 in Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.

On 8 Apr 1908 she married Homer Lathe Perkins in Chester, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.

15. Margaret Elizabeth Gale. Born on 16 May 1851 in Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[6] Margaret Elizabeth died in Cerebral Embolism, Canterbury, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, on 15 Jan 1919; she was 67.[7] Buried on 18 Jan 1919 in Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.

On 20 Jan 1872 Margaret Elizabeth Gale married Alfred Hermon Brown in Canterbury, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[8]

31. Mary Jane Merrill. Born on 2 May 1823 in Methuen, Essex County, Massachusetts.[9] Mary Jane died in Canterbury, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, on 28 Jun 1906; she was 83.[10] Buried in Walnut Grove Cemetery, Methuen, Essex County, Massachusetts.

On 26 Jun 1850 Mary Jane Merrill married Eliphalet Gale, perhaps in, Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[11]

63. Margaret Clark. Born on 28 Apr 1798 in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.[12] Margaret died in Canterbury, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, on 7 Nov 1875 at the age of 77[13] and was buried in Walnut Grove Cemetery, Methuen, Essex County, Massachusetts.

On 2 Jul 1822 Margaret Clark married Jonathan Merrill in Londonderry, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.

127. Mary Quimby.[14] Born about 1778. Her death date is unknown at this time.

Mary Quimby married James Clark about 1798.[15]


[1] Birth Certificate of Josephine Emma Perkins.
[2] State of Maine certificate of death, Josephine Woodward, 4 January 1993, York, Maine; and Obituary of Josephine Woodward, Concord Monitor, Concord, New Hampshire, 4 January 1993, p. B2. Although I was not present at the time of her death, I was present at her memorial service arranged by the Bennett Funeral Home, 209 N. Main St., Concord, New Hampshire.
[3] New Hampshire Marriage Records.” Marriage certificate of Oscar Herman Woodward Jr. and Josephine Emma Perkins.
[4] James Otis Lyford, History of the Town of Canterbury, New Hampshire, 1727-1912, 2 volumes (Concord, New Hampshire: The Rumford Press, 1912), II: 47. Hereinafter cited as History of the Town of Canterbury.
[5] Death Certificate of Alice M. Perkins, file #8303448, 10 June 1983, New Hampshire Bureau of Vital Statistics, Hazen Road, Concord, New Hampshire
[6] History of the Town of Canterbury, II: 156; and  “Death Record of Margaret Elizabeth Brown, recorded 20 January 1919, Box 500, New Hampshire Vital Statistics, Hazen Road, Concord, New Hampshire.
[7] Death Record of Margaret Elizabeth Brown, recorded 20 January 1919, Box 500, New Hampshire Vital Statistics, Hazen Road, Concord, New Hampshire.
[8] History of the Town of Canterbury, II: 46; Charles Henry Chandler, The History of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, 1735-1914 with Genealogical Records of the Principal Families (Fitchburg, Massachusetts: Sentinel Printing Company, 1914), 276; “New Hampshire Bride Index, Record Info: Family History Library microfilm: #0,975,694; Canterbury, New Hampshire, Records of Marriages, Births, and Deaths, 1719-1931, Canterbury, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Family History Library microfilm #2,259,048, item 3, 106-107.
[9] Vital Records of Methuen, Massachusetts, to the End of the Year 1849, Topsfield, Massachusetts: Topsfield Historical Society, Topsfield, 1909, 84; and History of the Town of Canterbury, II: 242.
[10] History of the Town of Canterbury, II: 156; and “New Hampshire Death Records, 1901-1948,” FamilySearch database, FamilySearch.org, viewed 4 February, 2011.
[11] History of the Town of Canterbury, II: 156.
[12] History of the Town of Canterbury, II: 242.
[13]  Commonwealth of Massachusetts copy of record of death, Margaret C. Merrill, No. 93765, February 1983, Boston, Massachusetts; and History of the Town of Canterbury, 242.
[14] History of the Town of Canterbury.
[15] History of the Town of Canterbury.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=363

Nov 20

Scrapbooking Sunday: Charlie at Old Sturbridge Village

Old Sturbridge Village is a living history museum, an 1830 rural New England Village. It was one of my favorite places to visit while I resided in Massachusetts. Charlie and I were there in November 1983 when I took the photographs that are in this scrapbook page. This scrapbook page was developed with paper and elements from “Dream A Little Dream” kit by Lauren Grier and DigitalScrapper.com.

I always thought it would be a delightful place to have Thanksgiving dinner, but never seemed to be able to pull that off.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=353

Nov 20

Thanksgiving Traditions

Thanksgivings during my childhood were generally spent with relatives on my Mom’s side of the family. “Over the River and through the Woods” was commonly sung as we made our way from Walpole to Chichester.  We generally dined at the large farm house of Ben and Eleanor Shaw on Bear Hill in Chichester. Ellen (Rowell) Shaw was  the niece of Nana Perkins (Alice M Brown Perkins). I always thought that there was such a crowd of people around the large dinning room table: Ben & Eleanor and their two children Carl and Pat (much older than Peter and I), Aunt Bell (Eleanor’s mother and sister-in-law of Nana Perkins), Nana Perkins, Mom & Dad, Peter, Richard, and I and later our younger sister, Gale). On rare occasion, Aunt Helen (Mom’s sister) and her son Jerome would join us.

The fare was nearly always the same: a huge turkey, giblet dressing, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, gravy, squash, and boiled onions. Once or twice lobster was added to the table, particularly for Nana Perkins. Dessert was always the traditional apple, pumpkin, and pecan pies. Eleanor made the best pies!

As young adults the tradition of place and people changed (not fare). There were not new family members consisting of the spouses the four Woodward siblings. We seemed to alternate years with the families of our spouses and it was more difficult, particularly after we started having children. It was not uncommon in those days for as many as twenty four family members around my table (tables that is). It was always a special time.

But then my second husband and I moved to Georgia and it was not easy getting back to New England for Thanksgiving with my family. So many Thanksgivings here in Georgia were spent with some of Charles friends and co-workers until his health began to decline. Even when we did dine with others, I just had to cook a Thanksgiving meal at home.

Recently I was invited to join other “orphans,” as we called ourselves – some of the staff of the National Archives  who had no family or none near enough to be able to share the day. I’m looking forward to another delightful Thanksgiving dinner with wonderful friends!  This year my brother Richard will be with us.

I’m thankful everyday for my many blessings, but always feel extra gratitude this time of year for my family and friends. I love Thanksgiving Day!

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All rights reserved.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=346

Nov 04

Parents of Homer Lathe Perkins

Although we have no contemporary record to provide evidence that Emma A. Jenkins was the mother of Homer Lathe Perkins nor a marriage record for John Butters Perkins and Emma A. Jenkins, we have the following evidence of their marriage.

  • Tombstone of John Butters Perkins and Emma A., his wife[1]
  • 1880 U.S. Census indicates that Emily A. is the wife of John B Perkins.[2]
  • 1900 U.S. Census: indicates that Emma A. is the wife of John B. Perkins, that Emma had given birth to four children, three of whom were still living[3] [Louisa B. died 31 July 1885.[4] John B. and Emma A. Perkins had both been married for 32 years. There were three children in the household: Etta Belle, daughter, born November 1869; Charles B., son, born June 1872; and Homer L., son, born Jun 1876.
  • Marriage of Etta B. Perkins and George W. Rowell states that Etta Belle’s parents were John B. Perkins and Emma Jenkins.[5]
  • Birth of Charles B. Perkins, born 13 June 1872, filed 28 February 1928,[6] show parents as John B. Perkins and Emma A. Jenkins.
  • Birth of Louisa B. Perkins, born 6 July 1875, filed 28 February 1925,[7] show parents as John B. Perkins and Emma A. Jenkins

Although much of the evidence is not “close” to the time of the event, I do believe that we have a strong argument indicating that the parents of Homer Lathe Perkins, were John B. Perkins and Emma Jenkins.



[1] Triple headstone for John B. Perkins; Emma A., his wife; and Louise B. Perkins, Mount Hope Cemetery, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire (behind the 1st Congregational Church in Loudon Village) photographed by Linda Woodward Geiger, September 1991.

[2] 1880 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Enumeration District 184, sheet 4D, dwelling 40, family 42, line 34; National Archives micropublication T9, reel 766; viewed on Ancestry.com 3 November 2011.

[3] 1890 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 150, Enumeration District 169, sheet 7A, dwelling 163, family 163, line 18; National Archives micropublication T623, reel 949; viewed at the National Archives-Southeast Region, East Point, Georgia.

[4] Triple headstone for John B. Perkins; Emma A., his wife; and Louise B. Perkins, Mount Hope Cemetery, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire (behind the 1st Congregational Church in Loudon Village) photographed by Linda Woodward Geiger, September 1991.

[5] State of New Hampshire marriage record of Etta Belle Perkins & George Rowell; FamilySearch database “New Hampshire Marriage Records, 1637-1947, image 505; viewed 3 November 2011 [in FamilySearch.org, the indexed refers to George U. Powell and Ella P. Perkins].

[6] State of New Hampshire birth record of Charles B. Perkins; FamilySearch database “New Hampshire Birth Records, Early to 1900, image 2602; viewed 4 November 2011. It should be noted that this is a derivate document filed some fifty-two years after his birth.

[7] State of New Hampshire birth record of Louisa B. Perkins; FamilySearch database “New Hampshire Birth Records, Early to 1900, image 2602; viewed 4 November 2011.  It should be noted that this is a derivate document filed some fifty years after her birth.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=338

Nov 02

Wordless Wednesday: Daughter & Father, about 1930

Josephine and her Dad, Homer Lathe Perkins

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=330

Oct 26

Wordless Wednesday: Hampton Beach 1922

Joesphine Emma Perkins, 1922

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=326

Oct 15

Ancestors GeneaMeme

This Saturday Night Genealogy Fun challenge, “Ancestors GeneaMeme” was created by Jill Ball (Geniaus blog).

The Rules: The list was annotated in the following manner:
Things you have already done or found: bold face type
Things you would like to do or find: italicize (colour optional)
Things you haven’t done or found and don’t care to: plain type
You are encouraged to add extra comments in brackets after each item

My responses are annotated as requested –

1.  Can name my 16 great-great-grandparents [have documentation for vital records of ¾ who where born in the U.S., but not for the four who lived in Nova Scotia]

2.  Can name over 50 direct ancestors

3.  Have photographs or portraits of my 8 great-grandparents 

4.  Have an ancestor who was married more than three times 

5.  Have an ancestor who was a bigamist [not that I know of]

6.  Met all four of my grandparents [My grandfather Perkins died before my birth]

7.  Met one or more of my great-grandparents [None of my great-grandparents were alive when I was born]

8.  Named a child after an ancestor

9.  Bear an ancestor’s given name/s

10.  Have an ancestor from Great Britain or Ireland

11.  Have an ancestor from Asia

12.  Have an ancestor from Continental Europe

13.  Have an ancestor from Africa

14.  Have an ancestor who was an agricultural laborer

15.  Have an ancestor who had large land holdings 

16.  Have an ancestor who was a holy man – minister, priest, rabbi 

17.  Have an ancestor who was a midwife (unsure)

18.  Have an ancestor who was an author. [My paternal grandfather, although he was seldom published]

19.  Have an ancestor with the surname Smith, Murphy or Jones

20.  Have an ancestor with the surname Wong, Kim, Suzuki or Ng

21.  Have an ancestor with a surname beginning with X

22.  Have an ancestor with a forename beginning with Z

23.  Have an ancestor born on 25th December [my paternal grandmother]

24.  Have an ancestor born on New Year’s Day [my father]

25.  Have blue blood in your family lines

26.  Have a parent who was born in a country different from my country of birth

27.  Have a grandparent who was born in a country different from my country of birth [my paternal grandmother]

28.  Can trace a direct family line back to the eighteenth century [all of my maternal lines and that of my paternal grandfather]

29.  Can trace a direct family line back to the seventeenth century or earlier [many]

30.  Have seen copies of the signatures of some of my great-grandparents [Daniel R. Woodward, Laura (Davis) Woodward]

31.  Have ancestors who signed their marriage certificate with an X [probably]

32.  Have a grandparent or earlier ancestor who went to university [not that I know of]

33. Have an ancestor who was convicted of a criminal offence [not that I know of]

34.  Have an ancestor who was a victim of crime [not that I know of]

35.  Have shared an ancestor’s story online or in a magazine [The Digital Genealogist and in a blog, “MusingsByLinda.com/MyFamily/]

36.  Have published a family history online or in print

37.  Have visited an ancestor’s home from the 19th or earlier centuries [Franklin, Canterbury, & Loudon, New Hampshire]

38.  Still have an ancestor’s home from the 19th or earlier centuries in the family

39.  Have a family bible from the 19th Century [have Bible of my great grandfather, Alfred H. Brown, but he did not record vitals therein]

40.  Have a pre-19th century family bible

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=322

Aug 23

The call of Minnesota

It was not unusual for young men with property to write their will in preparation for marching off to war.

In the opening lines of his last will and testament Lewis Davis wrote:, “I Lewis M Davis of the town of Franklin in the County of Merrimack and State of Newhampshire beinn about to start for the ward do make a disposal of my property …”  Of that property he later wrote that he owsed 160 acres in Stearns County, Minnesota. Furthermore, he leaves any property in possession at the time of his death to Cora E. Judkins daughter of Horace and Elisabeth Judkins and that the property should be left in the care of John Perver  until Cora become 18 years old.[1]

This document provides us with clues for additional research:

  • Search for an enlistment of Lewis M. Davis (perhaps of Franklin, New Hampshire) in the Union forces.
  • Search the Government Land Office (GLO) Records in Minnesota to determine if Lewis M. Davis obtained land under a homestead act, or if he was assigned land from another individual.
  • Search of land records in Stearns County, Minnesota. Activity for Salt Lake
  • Search the 1860 census of Stearns County, Minnesota, for Lewis M. Davis, since he has not been located in New Hampshire census records.

A search was conducted in the National Park Service database Civil War Soldier and Sailors[2] for the enlistment of Lewis M. Davis serving with the Union provided the following results:

Soldier Name Function Regiment Microfilm
Davis, Lewis Infantry 10th Regiment, N.H. Infantry M549 roll 3
Davis, Lewis F. Infantry 16th Regiment, N.H. Infantry M549 roll 3
Davis, Lewis F. Infantry 18th Regiment, N.H. Infantry M549 roll 3
Davis, Louis M. Infantry 16th Regiment, N.H. Infantry M549 roll 3

A search was conducted in “U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles” at Ancestry       .com for Lewis M Davis indicates he enlisted at the age of 29 on 13 September 1862 as a private in Company E, New Hampshire 16th Infantry Regiment and was mustered out on 20 August 1863 at Concord, New Hampshire, and that Davis died 21 August 1863.[3]

When the opportunity presents itself I need to examine the microfilm (M549, roll 3) of the service record of Lewis M. Davis in the 16thRegiment, New Hampshire Infantry. Davis’ brother-in-law, Daniel R. Woodward, also serviced in the 16th Regiment.

A search for individuals with the surname Davis obtaining land in Stearns County, Minnesota, provided results for not only Lewis M. Davis, but also his siblings, George Davis, and Albe C. Davis obtaining land in Stearns County, Minnesota (5th Principal Meridian) Township 126 N-034W.[4]

Accession Names Date Doc Twp – Rng Aliquots Sec
MN1900_.141 Davis, Albe C [P] 9/1/1869 175 126N-034W

126N-034W

126N-034W

SE1/4SE1/4

N1/2NE1/4

NW1/4NW1/4

15

22

23

MW-0235-014 Davis, George E [P}

McLaughlin, William [W]

8/15/1866 76850 126N-034W

126N-034W

126N-034W

SW1/4SE1/4

S1/2SW1/4

NW1/4NW1/4

15

15

22

MW-0150-207 Davis, Lewis M [P]

Burns, Susan [P]

Burns, Thomas [W]

1/20/1862 96321 126-034W

126N-034W

S1/2NE1/4

S1/2NW1/4

15

15

Jeremiah Judkins (spouse of Lewis M Davis’ sister, Nancy Davis) also obtained land in Stearns County. [5]

Accession Names Date Doc Twp – Rng Aliquots Sec
MW-0183-049 Judkins Jeremiah K [P]

Knapp, Alexander A [W]

5/20/1863 101298 126N-034W

126N-034W

S1/2NW1/4

S1/2NE1/4

23

22

Although all of the land acquisitions are post 1860, these men and respect families were enumerated in Stearns County, Minnesota, on 27–28 June 1860.[6]

Page Details Family summary
64 Lines 2 4–27; dwelling 697, family 561 Jerimiah Judkins; 31; M; farmer; %00; $300; b. New Hampshire
Nancy  “  ; 29; F; b. New Hampshire
Antonet  “  ; 7; F; b. New Hampshire
Ida Ann  “  ; 2 F; b. Minnesota
George E. Davis; 21; M; farmer; $500; b. New Hampshire
64 Lines 39–40; dwelling 698, family 562 Albert [Albe] Davis; 25; M; farmer; $500; b. New Hampshire
Sarah C.   “  ‘ 19; F; b. Maine
65 Line 10, dwelling 701, family 565 Louis M. Davis; 27; M; farmer; $500, $200; b. New Hampshire [no other household members]

 

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved


[1] Will of Lewis M. Davis, file no. 6128, Merriamck County New Hampshire Probate Court, Concord, New Hampshire.

[3] Rodney Sawyer, Register of Soldiers and Sailors of New Hampshire, 1861–1865; viewed 21 August 2011.

[4] Government Land Office, Bureau of Land Management, RG49; http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/search/default.aspx

[5] Government Land Office, Bureau of Land Management, RG49; http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/search/default.aspx

[6] 1860 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Stearns County, Minnesota, pages 64-65; National Archives microfilm series M653, reel 574; viewed on HeritageQuest Online, 21 August 2011.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=320

Older posts «

» Newer posts