May 23

52 Ancestors: #17 Josephine Perkins

JosephinePerkins002

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=725

Apr 22

52 Ancestors: #16 Stephen Perkins

While writing this post, I’ve noted several inconsistencies that need to be resolved. That being said, let me share with you the known events in the life of my third great grandfather, Stephen Perkins.

Stephen1 Perkins, son of Newman Perkins and Sarah Sawyer was born in Wells, York County, Maine, 12 February 1771.[1]

Stephen Perkins married Sally Davis of Lee, Strafford County, New Hampshire, 14 August 1800, in Epping, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.[2] Sally was born 7 April 1777,[3] and died 25 August 1841 at age 64.[4]

In the 1820 Census, Stephen was listed as a head of household in Chichester, Rockingham County.[5] The household, of seven, consisted of two males from 10 to 15, one male from 16 to 25, one male age 45 and upward, one female under 10, one female from 16 to 25, and one female from 26 to 44.

On 3 June 1825, Nancy Lane and her husband Jeremiah acknowledged a deed from her father, Stephen Perkins, of Chichester (now in Merrimack County)—for “a farm situated in Loudon in said county [Merrimack] of the value of five hundred Dollars bearing date the 25th December 1824, which farm with what he has otherwise given me, and what he may hereafter freely give me during his natural life, I have agreed to accept and receive … in full payment and satisfaction of the proportion I or my heirs may ever be entitled to have and receive out of and from the estate of the said Stephen Perkins…”. [6]

In the 1830 Census, Stephen was listed as a head of household of five in Chichester (one male age 10 thru 14, one male age 15 thru 19, one male age 50 thru 59, 1 female age 15 thru 19, and one female age 50 thru 59).[7]   This record is a derivative copy since the entries are arranged in rough alphabetical order by the first letter of the surname.

Stephen Perkins, husbandman, sold his farm (excepting that which he had previously given to his son Moses Perkins) to Stephen Perkins Junior (in all likely-hood his son) for consideration of $3000.[8] Within the deed the property is described as The Farm on which I now live in said Chichester containing two hundred acres more or less, bounded on the northwest by John Maxfield- north by Stephen Robie and Josiah Prescott northeast by Jabez James and others – on the east by Stephen Robie and on the south by John Berry and Wells Ely – southwest by Jeremiah Lane and by said Maxfield on the west being all my Homestead Farm in said Chichester except a piece of interval north east of the river heretofore given to my son Moses (together with the buildings on said farm.” The conveyance was made on the 30th of January 1803 and not recorded until 30 January 1833. If the date of the instrument (30 January 1803) is correct, then Stephen Junior could not have been the son of Stephen, husbandman, since Stephen Junior was not born until 1806 and Moses would have been about two years old. I suspect that an error occurred when the clerk of court recorded the deed. It is more reasonable that the indenture took place on 30 January 1833. A greater study of the Merrimack County (and her mother county, Rockingham) deeds is necessary.

On 9 October 1835, Stephen Perkins, husbandman, sold “all my right and title to one fourth part of a certain Saw Mill standing on Gilmanton Brook so called in said Chichester it being the same that I purchased of Jonathan Gove, Henry Robey and Jabez James” to Stephen Perkins 2nd, farmer. The deed was witnessed by D.K. Foster and Joshua Lane and recorded on the 9th of October 1835.[9] This is the first and only reference that I’ve located referencing a Stephen Perkins the 2nd. Could this man be the same man who is called Stephen Perkins Junior?

Albe Cady and Leonard Kimball witnessed a lease transaction between Stephen Perkins, Junior, and Stephen Perkins, Senior, (both of Chichester) on 4 April 1838. Stephen leased to his father, in consideration of eleven hundred and sixty eight dollars, the farm in said Chichester on which he now lives containing two hundred acres more or less being the same farm which was conveyed by said Stephen Senior to said Stephen Junior by deed dated January 30, 1833. Stephen Perkins Senior had the right to “occupy, enjoy and in such way and manner as he may deem proper to manage the premises without committing unnecessary waste thereon, and to receive the profits thereof during the period of his life.“

In the 1840 Census, Stephen was listed as a head of household of four, two of whom were active in agriculture in Chichester.[10] The home consisted of one male 20 thru 29, one male 60 thru 69, one female 15 thru 19, and one female 60 thru 69.

Stephen was enumerated in the dwelling of his son, Stephen, on 23 October 1850. Stephen was listed as a head of household with a woman named Eliza and at the time he reportedly had real estate valued at $3,500.[11]

It is likely that Stephen Perkins died sometime between 22 July 1857 when he signed his will and fourth Tuesday of September 1857 (22 September 1857) when his will was submitted for probate in the Merrimack County Probate Court[12]. Consequently the death date, 27 December 1857, provided by Jones in his Vital Statistics of Chichester, New Hampshire, 1742-1927 incorrect. [13]

According to family tradition, Stephen and his wife, Sally, were buried in Chichester, but as yet, I have no supporting evidence for their burial.

Known children of Stephen Perkins and Sally Davis:

i.       Moses Davis2 Perkins was born 19 November 1801.[14]

ii.       Nancy D. Perkins was born 13 April 1804.[15]

iii.       Stephen Perkins II was born 20 April 1806.[16]

iv.       Susan Perkins was born in Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire 20 April 1806,[17] or 16 January 1808.[18] [Is it possible that Stephen’s first daughter, Susan died as an infant and he named a subsequent daughter Susan in her memory?]

v.       Sally F. Perkins was born 25 April 1814.[19]

vi.       James K. Perkins was born 15 July 1816.[20]

Future Research

  • Who was the woman called Eliza, age 61, in the 1850 household of Stephen Perkins? [21] Did Stephen remarry after the death of his wife, Sally, who died 25 August 1841?[22]
  • Make a through study of the property records of Rockingham and Merrimack Counties, particularly those relating any Stephen Perkins. It will be important to study each transaction when Stephen obtains and disposes of parcels of land.
  • Try to determine where Stephen and his wife Sally were buried.
  • Study all extant probate records to make a better determination of when Stephen passed away. Stephen Perkins died in Merrimack County and his Probate Case file is file # 4687.[23]
  • Study the town records of Chichester to determine if Stephen and Sally had two daughters named Susan (the first may have died in infancy).

 

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

 

[1] Thomas Allen Perkins, comp., Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine and His Descendants, 1583-1936 (Haverhill, Mass.: Record Publishing Company, 1947), 16. Hereafter cited as Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine.

[2] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 41.

[3] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 41.

[4] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 41.

[5] Stephen Perkins entry, 1820 U.S. Federal Census, Population Schedule, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, Chichester, page 136, line 3; National Archives micropublication M33, reel 60.

[6] Receipt of land from Stephen Perkins to Nancy and Jeremiah Lane, Deed Book 4: 527-8, County Clerk’s Office, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.

[7] Stephen Perkins entry, 1830 U.S. Federal Census, Population Schedule, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Chichester, page 180, line 12; National Archives micropublication M19, reel 76.

[8] Stephen Perkins to Stephen Perkins Junior, Sale of Land, Deed Book 53: 402. County Clerk’s Office, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.

[9] Stephen Perkins to Stephen Perkins 2d, Sale of Saw Mill Rights, 67: 295. County Clerk’s Office, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. Hereafter cited as S. Perkins to S. Perkins, Jr., Merrimack Deed Bk. 67.

[10] Stephen Perkins entry, 1840 U.S. Federal Census, Population Schedule, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Chichester, page 45, line 22; National Archives micropublication M704, reel 240.

[11] 1850 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 20B, dwelling 8, family 12, lines 16–17; National Archives microfilm M432, reel 436.

[12] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Probate Records Volume 34: 153; Family History Library microfilm #0,016,181.

[13] William Haslet Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, New Hampshire, 1742-1927 (Bowie, Maryland: Heritage Books, Inc., 2000), 31, hereinafter cited as Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester. This is a derivative record of at least one generation.

[14] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 90; and Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, 31.

[15] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 41; and Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, 31.

[16] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 91; and Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, 31.

[17] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 90.

[18] Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, 31.

[19] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 90-91; and Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, 31.

[20] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 90-91; and Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, 31.

[21] 1850 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 20B, dwelling 8, family 11, lines ; National Archives microfilm M432, reel 436.

[22] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 41.

[23] Index to Merrimack County Probate Records, County Clerk’s Office, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Family History Library microfilm 1,561,608.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=721

Apr 14

52 Ancestors: #15 Stephen Perkins of Chichester

Stephen Perkins and his wife, Betsey Lane, were my second great grandparents.

Stephen Perkins was born on 20 April 1806 in Chichester, Rockingham County,[1] New Hampshire.[2]He died on 20 September 1897 at the age of 91 in Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[3]

Stephen Perkins II and Betsey Lane were married on 25 November 1832.[4] Betsey Lane, daughter of Jeremiah Lane and Eunice Tilton, was born on 23 July 1805 in Chichester, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.[5] She died on 22 September 1890 at the age of 85 in Chichester.[6]

Stephen and Betsey were buried in Chichester.[7]

Stephen Perkins and Betsey Lane had the following children, all born in Chichester:

  1. Hannah H. Perkins was born on 19 May 1835 and died on 25 November.[8]
  2. Stephen Prentiss Perkins, born 6 March 1837;[9] married Lavina Jane Case, 22 November 1866; and died 16 May 1903, Chichester.[10]
  3. Sarah Eunice Perkins, born 6 March 1840;[11] married Rinaldo Bracket Foster, 15 July 1860, Chichester; and died 20 October 1899, in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  4. Jeremiah Lane Perkins, born 26 March 1842;[12] married Jennie Maria Osgood, 29 March 1874, in Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire; and died 21 November 1899, in Loudon.[13]
  5. John Butters Perkins, born 25 January 1844;[14] married Emma Adeline Jenkins; and died 7 May 1918, in Loudon[15]. [See blog post http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=707]
  6. Charles B. Perkins was born on 13 August 1846;[16] and died on 12 February 1874 at the age of 27 in Chichester[17].
  7. Ann M. Perkins, born 3 November 1849; married Charles Eddy Payne, 18 September 1876; and died 4 January 1929, in Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[18]

Stephen, son of Stephen, is typically called Stephen Jr. and resided near his father in Chichester.

Census Records

Stephen and his family were enumerated in Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire from 1830 through 1880.

1830.  Stephen (listed as 20 to 30), living alone, resided next door to his father, Stephen Perkins.[19] This population schedule did not offer reference to occupation.

1840.  Stephen and his family were residing next door to his father, Stephen Perkins. Of the six people (1 male under 5, 1 male 5 to 10, 2 males 30 to 40, 1 female under 5, and 1 female 30 to 40) in his household, three were engaged in Agriculture.[20]

23 October 1850.[21] Stephen Perkins, Household (all born in New Hampshire):

Stephen Perkins, age 44, farmer, real estate valued at $200
Betsey Perkins, age 44
Stephen P. Perkins, age 13
Sarah E. Perkins, age 10
Jeremiah L. Perkins, age 8
John B. Perkins, age 6
Charles L. Perkins, age 4
Ann M. Perkins, age 3/4

9 June 1860.[22] Stephen Perkins Household (all born in New Hampshire):

Stephen Perkins, age 54, farmer, real estate valued at $1,600 and personal property valued at $15,000
Betsy, age 54
Stephen P., age 23, farmer
Sarah, age 20
Jeremiah, age 18, student
John B., age 16
Chas. F., age 14
Ann, age 10

26 June 1870.[23]  Stephen Perkins Household (all born in New Hampshire):

Stephen Perkins, age 64, farmer, real property valued at $6,000 and personal property valued at $12,000
Betsey, age 64, keeping house
Jeremiah, age 28, farm laborer
Charles F, age 23, farm laborer
Ann M., age 20,

24 June 1880.[24] Stephen Perkins Household (all born in New Hampshire)

Stephen Perkins, age 74, farmer
Betsy, age 74, wife, keeping house
Prentice [Stephen Prentiss] Perkins, age 42, son, farmer
Lavina, 36, daughter-in-law, age 36, keeping house
Alice M., grand daughter, age 10, at school
Stephen C. grandson, age 7, at school
William R Adams, age 75, servant, farm laborer

Property Records

The 1850, 1860, and 1870 federal census records Stephen with real property. A consequent incomplete search of deed records in Merrimack County provides some clues. However, it is necessary for the deed work (search and analysis) to continue.

To date the following documents have been located:

Probate Records

Stephen affixed his signature to his last will and testament on 29 Jun 1887 in Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[29] Stephen’s will described the following bequeaths:

  • “,,, unto my daughter Ann M. Paine, the sum of five dollars”
  • “… unto my daughter Sarah E. Foster, the sum of five dollars”
  • “… unto my son John B. Perkins of Loudon… the sum of one dollar”
  • “… unto my son Jeremiah L. Perkins the interest and income of fifteen shares of the National State Capital Bank of Concord New Hampshire for and during the time of his natural life from and immediately after the decease of said Jeremiah L. Perkins I give and bequeath unto my grandchildren Alice M. Perkins, Stephen C. Perkins and Ralph S. Perkins children of my son Stephen P. Perkins the aforesaid fifteen share of Bank stock to be divided equally among them.”
  • “… unto my aforesaid son Jeremiah L. Perkins all the demands and promissory notes which I hold against my son John B. Perkins and all debts due me from said John B. Perkins”
  • “… unto my son Stephen P. Perkins his heirs and assigns forever all the residue of my estate both real and personal estate wherever found or however situated”

Stephen appointed Thomas H. Thorndike, Esq. of Pittsfield to be his sole executor. David T. Brown, Stephen R. Watson, and F.H. Thorndike were witnesses to this will, dated 29 June 1887.

Stephen’s will was presented for probate 4 September 1897 in Merrimack County Court of Probate, Concord, New Hampshire.

Future Research

  • Continue deed research, seeking and analyzing, in Merrimack County, New Hampshire with Stephen Perkins as grantor and grantee.
  • Perform a complete search of probate records for Stephen Perkins in Merrimack County, New Hampshire.

 

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.



[1] Chichester became part of Merrimack County when that county was formed out of Rockingham and Hillsborough Counties in 1823 [John H. Long, Editor, New Hampshire, Vermont, Atlas of Historical County Boundaries (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993), 47].

[2] William Haslet Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, New Hampshire, 17421927 (Bowie, Maryland: Heritage Books, 2000), 31; hereinafter cited as Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester.

[3] Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, 127.

[4] Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, 65.

[5] Thomas Allen Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, and His Descendants, 15831936 (Haverhill, Massachusetts: Record Publishing Company, 1947), 91; hereinafter cited as Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine.

[6] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 91.

[7] Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, 127.

[8] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 91.

[9] Town Records of Chichester, New Hampshire, Volume V (Chichester, New Hampshire: The Town), 116; Family History Library microfilm 15,099; hereinafter cited as Town Records of Chichester.

[10] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 91.

[11] Town Records of Chichester, 116.

[12] Town Records of Chichester, 116.

[13] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 180.

[14] Town Records of Chichester, 116.

[15] Deaths Registered in the Town of Loudon for the Year Ending December 31, 1906, Annual Report of the Town of Loudon, 1907 (Concord, New Hampshire: The Town of Loudon, 1907).

[16] Town Records of Chichester, 116.

[17] Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, 127. In this derivate publication, he was called Charles F. Perkins.

[18] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 91.

[19] 1830 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 180, line 13; National Archives microfilm M19, reel 76.

[20] 1840 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 48, line 23; National Archives microfilm M704, reel 240.

[21] 1850 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 40, dwelling 8, family 11; National Archives microfilm M432, reel 436.

[22] 1860 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 22, dwelling 188, family 188, lines 24–31; National Archives microfilm M653, reel 677.

[23] 1870 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Chichester, New Hampshire, page 88, dwelling 7, family 8, lines 27–31; National Archives microfilm M593, reel 845 viewed on Ancestry.com, 13 April 2014.

[24] 1880 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 83B,  Enumeration District 165, dwelling 106, family 118, lines 21-26; National Archives microfilm T9, reel 765.

[25] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 22: 512; Family History Library microfilm #16,121.

[26] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 67: 295; Family History Library microfilm #16,144.

[27] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 53: 519; Family History Library microfilm #16,137.

[28] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 53: 519; Family History Library microfilm #16,137.

[29] Will of Stephen Perkins, New Hampshire, Merrimack County, Probate Records, 1880–1900, Volume 88: 334–335; Family History Library microfilm #1,571,928.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=713

Apr 12

52 Ancestors: #14 John Butters Perkins

This 52 week, 52 Ancestors challenge is proving to be very interesting. As I analysis the research I’ve conducted, it is apparent that I should have put my blinders on—why in the world have I no record of possible estate or property records of John Butters Perkins? John would have been about seventeen years old at the beginning of the Civil War. Why have I not searched for possible Union service for him? All I have are the boring vital statistics and census records for John and his family.

John Butters Perkins, son of Stephen Perkins and Betsey Lane, was born on 25 January 1844 in Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[1] He died of a cerebral hemorrhage on 7 May 1918 at the age of 74 in Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[2]

John Butters Perkins married Emma Adeline Jenkins,[3] about 1868. Emma Adeline, daughter of William Jenkins and Joanne B. Foss, was born on 9 Nov 1847 in Barnstead, Belknap County, New Hampshire. She died on 6 Mar 1906 at the age of 58 in Loudon.[4]

Death of John B. Perkins

John B. and Emma A. were buried with their daughter Louise in Mount Hope Cemetery, Loudon Village, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[5]

tombstone_PerkinsJohnB-Emma

John and his family were enumerated on the federal decennial census records on 16 June 1870,[6] 3 June 1880,[7] and on 21 June 1900.[8] John was enumerated in the home of his son, Homer L. Perkins on 9 May 1910, in Loudon.[9]

John Butters Perkins and Emma Adeline Jenkins had the following children:

  1. Etta Belle Perkins, born 7 November 1869,[10] Manchester, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire; married George Wilmer Rowell, 29 August 1903, Boscawen, Merrimack County, New Hampshire;[11] died 10 Oct 1950 and buried with her husband in Moore Cemetery, in Loudon.[12]
  2. Charles Bauman Perkins, born 13 June 1873, Loudon; married Grace Clough, 27 February 1904, Pittsfield, Merrimack County.[13]
  3. Louise Betsy Perkins was born on 6 July 1875 in Loudon. [14] She died on 31 July 1885 at the age of 10 in Loudon and was buried in Mount Hope Cemetery.[15]
  4. Homer Lathe Perkins, born 16 Jun 1879, Loudon; married Alice Margaret Brown, 8 April 1908, Chester, Rockingham County, New Hampshire; and died 22 August1939, Loudon. [See previous blog entry http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=701.]

Future Research

  • Search for deeds (grantee and grantor) in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, for John Butters Perkins.
  • Search for possible probate records for John B. Perkins in Merrimack County from 1910 and possibly forward for several years.
  • Search for possible service in the Union during the Civil War Period for John Butters Perkins.
© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.


[1] Tombstone of John B. Perkins; Emma A, his wife, and Louise B. Perkins, Mount Hope Cemetery, located in Loudon Village, behind the Congregation Church, viewed and photographed by the author, 28 September 1991 (hereinafter cited as Tombstone of John B. Perkins, et al); and William Haslet Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, New Hampshire, 1742–1927 (Bowie Maryland: Heritage Books, Inc., 2000), 31.

[2] “New Hampshire, Death Records, 1654-1947,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11623-1872-63?cc=1601211 : accessed 11 Apr 2014), 004243185 > image 1913 of 2917; citing Bureau Vital Records and Health Statistics, Concord; Tombstone of John B. Perkins, et al; and Deaths Registered in the Town of Loudon for the Year Ending December 31, 1906, Annual Report of the Town of Loudon, 1919 (Concord, New Hampshire: The Town of Loudon, 1920).

[3] Thomas Allen Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, and His Descendants, 1583-1936 (Haverhill, Massachusetts: Record Publishing company, 1947), 181.

[4] Deaths Registered in the Town of Loudon for the Year Ending December 31, 1906, Annual Report of the Town of Loudon, 1907 (Concord, New Hampshire: The Town of Loudon, 1907).

[5] Tombstone of John B. Perkins, et al.

[6] 1870 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 384B, dwelling 195, family 177 lines 6–8; National Archives microfilm M593, reel 846.

[7] 1880 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 364D, Enumeration District 184, dwelling 40, family 42, lines 33–38; National Archives microfilm T9, reel 766.

[8] 1900 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 150, Enumeration District 169, sheet 7, dwelling 163, family 163, lines 17–21; National Archives microfilm T623, reel 949.

[9] 1910 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Enumeration District 220, sheet 9A, dwelling 164, family 166, lines 1–4; National Archives microfilm T624, reel 865.

[10] Tombstone of George W. Rowell and Etta B. Perkins, his wife, Moore Cemetery, located in Loudon Village, behind the Congregation Church adjacent to Mount Hope Cemetery, viewed and photographed by the author, 28 September 1991 (hereinafter cited as Tombstone of George and Etta B. Perkins Rowell).

[11] “New Hampshire, Marriage Records, 1637-1947,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FL85-HFN : accessed 11 Apr 2014), Emma A. Jenkins in entry for Charles B. Perkins and Grace A. Clough, 27 Feb 1904; citing Pittsfield, , New Hampshire, Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics, Concord; FHL microfilm 2069876.

[12] Tombstone of George W. Rowell and Etta B. Perkins, his wife, Moore Cemetery, located in Loudon Village, behind the Congregation Church adjacent to Mount Hope Cemetery, viewed and photographed by the author, 28 September 1991 (hereinafter cited as Tombstone of George and Etta B. Perkins Rowell).

[13] “New Hampshire, Marriage Records, 1637-1947,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FL85-HFN : accessed 11 Apr 2014), Emma A. Jenkins in entry for Charles B. Perkins and Grace A. Clough, 27 Feb 1904; citing Pittsfield, , New Hampshire, Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics, Concord; FHL microfilm 2069876.

[14] Tombstone of John B. Perkins, et al.

[15] Tombstone of John B. Perkins, et al.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=707

Apr 02

52 Ancestors: #13 Homer Lathe Perkins

HLPerkinsHomer Lathe Perkins was one of nearly thirty thousand men between the ages of thirty-seven to forty-five who answered the call of the Selective Service to register for the draft on the 12th of September 1918.[1] That, in it self, is not surprising. However, her resided in the village of Loudon and I would have expected him to travel into Concord (only 8 miles away from his home) to register. Why did he register in Franklin (some 22 miles away)?  That is a puzzle to which I need a solution.

Unfortunately I never met my Grandfather Perkins—he died before I was born. But I do know that he was a wheeler and dealer. I have in my possession a large number of original deeds relating to his buying and selling of land in and about Loudon. His wife, Nana Perkins, once told me that he’d buy a house, she’d work hard to make it a home and as soon as she did, he’d sell the place. I knew she lived in the house I remember in Loudon for several years before his death and when I asked her how she managed to stay there, she said, “When he put out the ‘for sale’ sign, I simply when out in the yard and yanked it up and he got the message.”

Perkins_1931-150x150

1930Chevrolet

In 1930 Homer and Alice purchased a new Chevrolet Sedan from Gossville Garage in Epsom, N.H.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Homer Lathe Perkins, son of John Butter Perkins and Emma Adeline Jenkins, was born in Loudon (Merrimack County), New Hampshire, 16 June 1879.[2] He died 22 August 1939 in Loudon.[3]

Homer L. Perkins and Alice M. Brown were married 8 April 1908 in Chester (Rockingham County), New Hampshire, by Albert Hall, Minister of the Gospel.[4]

The couple had two daughters.[5]

i.      Helen Elizabeth Perkins, born 7 February 1909 in Loudon;[6] died 14 November 1976 in Keene (Cheshire County), New Hampshire;[7] and was buried in Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord (Merrimack County), New Hampshire. She and John William Galloway were married, 18 July 1936, in Loudon by William Hastings, Congregational minister.[8] Helen and John had one child.

ii.      Josephine Emma Perkins, born 30 December 1917 in Concord, New Hampshire;[9] died in York, Maine;[10] and was buried in Blossom Hill Cemetery, in Concord. She married Oscar H. Woodward, Jr., September 1940 in Chichester, New Hampshire.[11] Josephine and Oscar had four children.

perkins-woodwardHomer and Alice are buried in Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord, New Hampshire.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.



[1] World War I Draft Registration Card of Homer Lathe Perkins, Homer Lathe Perkins, 12 September 1918, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Selective Service Records, Record Group 163, National Archives at Atlanta, Morrow, Georgia; hereinafter cited as WWI Draft Card of Homer Lathe Perkins.

[2] WWI Draft Card of Homer Lathe Perkins.

[3] Certificate of Death, Homer Lathe Perkins, New Hampshire Department of Vital Records, Hazen Road, Concord, New Hampshire.

[4] Certificate of Marriage of Homer L Perkins and Alice M. Brown in possession of the author.

[5] History of New Ipswich, 275–276.

[6] Birth Record of Helen E. Perkins, Annual Report of the Financial Affairs of the Town of Loudon for the Year Ending 15 February 1909 (Concord, N.H.: The Town, 1909), 37.

[7] Tombstone of Helen Perkins Galloway, Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord, New Hampshire, viewed and photographed by the author, 9 August 1993.

[8] New Hampshire Marriage Records, 1637-1947, Downloaded from FamilySearch.org, 5 August 2013.

[9] Birth Record of Josephine E. Perkins, Annual Report of the Financial Affairs of the Town of Loudon for the Year Ending 15 February 1917 (Concord, N.H.: The Town, 1917).

[10] Death Certificate of Josephine P. Woodward, #93 00989, State of Maine, Department of Human Resources, York, Maine.

[11] Marriage Record of Oscar Herman Woodward Jr. and Josephine Emma Perkins, New Hampshire Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics, Hazen Road, Concord, New Hampshire

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=701

Mar 25

52 Ancestors: #12 Josiah Brown

Many years ago, my grandmother, Alice M.  (Brown) Perkins, asked me to learn more about  her second great grandfather (my fourth great grandfather), Josiah Brown,  Revolutionary War service. Josiah, a resident of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, was. At the time I only found reference to his Revolutionary service in two authored town histories.[1]

In his History of New Ipswich, Chandler states,

Josiah enlisted 10 May 1775 and mustered 11 July 1775 for duty in the American Revolution. At that time we was described as a 32 year old farmer, 5 feet 8 inches, fair complexion, and light eyes. He served as a 1st Lieutenant in Capt. Ezra Town’s company, Col. James Read’s regiment. He fought at Bunker Hill and latter led a company of men to assist at Fort Ticonderoga.[2]

Chandler devoted the fifth chapter of his book to “The Revolutionary Period” and includes considerable discussion relating to Captain Ezra Town’s company and Captain Josiah Brown. Therein, Chandler states that Captain Josiah Brown of New Ipswich was the commander of men who marched, May 6th, 1777, for Fort Ticonderoga.[3]

Lyford simply states, “He was at the battle of Bunker Hill,”[4] and family tradition adds that he was the last to retreat from Bunker Hill. I always teased my grandmother, by telling her that the only reason he was the last to retreat was because he could not run as fast as the others. With a twinkle in her eye, she’d reply with a “pesst!”

Josiah Brown was born in Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 30 January 1742 son of John & Elizabeth (Potter) Brown;[5] and died in New Ipswich, 18 March 1831.[6] He married Sarah Wright in Concord, Massachusetts, 31 October 1765.[7]

Josiah and Sarah resided in New Ipswich on Flat Mountain by 1766 and were members of the New Ipswich Congregational Church before 1786.[8] He was later instrumental in forming the Baptist Church and was the first deacon of that church.[9]

Known children of Josiah and Sarah (Wright) Brown (most likely all of them were born in New Ipswich):

i.      Josiah Brown was born 1 October 1766;[10] baptized in New Ipswich Congregational Church 25 Oct 1767;[11] and died in Whitingham, Windham County, Vermont, 20 January 1848.[12] Josiah married Milicent Wright m Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, on the 20th of April 1792.[13]

ii.      Joseph Brown was born 10 October 1767;[14] and died in Whitingham, Vermont, 2 March 1827.[15] Joseph married Sally Preston in New Ipswich, 2 May 1791.[16]

iii.      Jonas Brown was born 4 March 1769;[17] and died in Whitingham, Vermont, 23 February 1836.[18]  He married Lois Russell in New Ipswich, 28 February 1796.[19]

iv.      Sarah Brown was born, 22 November 1770;[20] and died 20 April 1822.[21] She married Reuben Brown in New Ipswich, 1 July 1793.[22] Reuben, Sarah’s first cousin, was born in Concord, Massachusetts, 15 Mar 1769, son of John and Elizabeth (Bateman) Brown;[23] Reuben died 17 July 1853, probably in Brownsville in Canada.[24]

v.      Aaron Brown was born 8 December 1772.[25]  [See blog post http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=692]

vi.      Amos Brown was born 11 September 1774;[26] and died10 May 1864. [27] He married Sarah Tarbell, 5 April 1803.[28]

vii.      Abner Brown was born 27 July 1776;[29] and died at New Ipswich 4 April 1824.[30] He married 1st, Polly Jaquith, 10 December 1805; and 2nd, Polly Ayer, 16 May 1815.[31]

viii.      Rebecca Brown was born 5 July 1778;[32] and died 9 June 1853.[33] She married Nathan Perry.[34]

ix.      Levi Brown was born 6 August 1780;[35] and died 10 September 1840. [36] He married Betsey Temple, 15 May 1803.[37]

x.      Nathan Brown was born 25 July 1882;[38] and died in Whitingham, Vermont, 21 January 1862.[39] He married Betsey Goldsmith, 3 June 1806.[40]

xi.      Heywood Brown was born 2 July 1784;[41] and died 2 March 1867. [42] He married Sally Walcott, 5 February 1809.[43]

xii.      Betsey Brown was born 7 February 1787; and died 11 July 1793. [44]

xiii.      Abigail Brown was born 22 June 1790; and died 24 April 1864.[45] She married Asa Farnsworth.[46]

 

Future Research

  1. Search the Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, Index to Probate Records, 1771-1921[47] for reference to the Estate of Aaron Brown.
  2. Search for a map, with residence indicated, of New Ipswich and vicinity about 1800 or so.
  3. Sort through the numerous “Brown” deeds previously transcribed or abstracted to sort men with the same name and determine what property Josiah and Sarah (Wright) Brown owned in New Ipswich and possibly in other parties of Hillsborough County.

 

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.



[1] Charles Henry Chandler and Sarah Fiske Lee, The History of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, 1735–1914, with Genealogical Records of the Principal Families (Fitchburg, Massachusetts: Sentinel Printing Company, 1914), 269; hereinafter cited as History of New Ipswich; and James Otis Lyford, History of the Town of Canterbury, New Hampshire, 17271912 (Concord, New Hampshire: The Rumford Press, 1912), II: 46; hereinafter cited as History of Canterbury.

[2] History of New Ipswich, 269.

[3] History of New Ipswich, 87.

[4] History of Canterbury, 45.

[5] Concord, Massachusetts, Births, Marriages, and Deaths, 16351850 (Reprint, Charlestown, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), 156; hereinafter cited as Concord, Vital Records.

[6] History of New Ipswich, 269; and Charles Edward Potter, Genealogies of Some Old Families of Concord, Mass. And Their Descendants in Part to the Present Generation, volume 1 (Boston: Alfred Mudge & Son, Printers, 1887), 54; hereinafter cited as Genealogies of Some Old Families of Concord.

[7] Concord Vital Records, 221; and History of New Ipswich, 269.

[8] New Ipswich Town Records, 134.

[9] History of New Ipswich, 269.

[10] New Ipswich Town Records, 9.

[11] New Ipswich Town Records, 102.

[12] History of New Ipswich.

[13] Concord Vital Records, 358; and History of New Ipswich, 271.

[14] New Ipswich Town Records (n.p.: typescript, n.d.), 8; typescript in possession of the New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord, New Hampshire; hereinafter cited as New Ipswich Town Records.

[15] History of New Ipswich, 271.

[16] New Ipswich Town Records, 74; and History of New Ipswich, 271.

[17] New Ipswich Town Records, 9.

[18] History of New Ipswich, 271.

[19] New Ipswich Town Records, 74; and History of New Ipswich, 269.

[20] New Ipswich Town Records, 9; and History of New Ipswich, 269.

[21] History of New Ipswich, 269.

[22] New Ipswich Town Records, 74; and History of New Ipswich, 269.

[23] Concord Vital Records, 228.

[24] History of New Ipswich, 270.

[25] New Ipswich Town Records, 9; and History of New Ipswich, 269.

[26] New Ipswich Town Records, 9; and History of New Ipswich, 269.

[27] History of New Ipswich, 272.

[28] Ibid.

[29] New Ipswich Town Records, 9; and History of New Ipswich, 269.

[30] New Ipswich Cemetery Records; Family History Center microfilm # 0015568 item 4.

[31] History of New Ipswich, 272–273.

[32] New Ipswich Town Records, 9; and History of New Ipswich, 269.

[33] History of New Ipswich, 269.

[34] Ibid.

[35] New Ipswich Town Records, 9; and History of New Ipswich, 269.

[36] History of New Ipswich, 269.

[37] Ibid.

[38] New Ipswich Town Records, 9; and History of New Ipswich, 269.

[39] History of New Ipswich, 273.

[40] Ibid.

[41] History of New Ipswich, 269.

[42] History of New Ipswich, 273.

[43] Ibid.

[44] History of New Ipswich, 270.

[45] Ibid.

[46] Ibid.

[47] Family History Library microfilm 0,016,069.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=696

Mar 24

52 Ancestors: #11 Aaron Brown

Researching ancestors with the surname Brown can be a challenge at best, but when they marry first and second cousins, things can become quite confusing. This appears to be a common phenomenon among my Brown ancestors who settled in Concord, Massachusetts, and then moved on into New Ipswich, New Hampshire in the 1700s.

My third great grandfather, Aaron Brown, was the fifth known child of Josiah Brown and Sarah Wright. He was born in New Ipswich, New Hampshire, on the 8th of December 1772[1] and died 15 February 1828.[2] Aaron married his first cousin Hannah Brown on the 16th of April 1795.[3] Hannah, daughter of John Brown and Elizabeth Bateman was born 28 April 176 and died 15 February 1852.[4] Aaron and Hannah were buried in New Ipswich’s Central Cemetery.[5]

According to Candler, Aaron occupied “the farm of his father-in-law, John Brown on the crest of the mountain. He also for a few years after the construction of the turnpike kept a store near his home. He sturdily maintained the activities of his father, Capt. Josiah Brown, being a lieutenant and also a prominent supporter of the Baptist church, and like his father, a deacon.”[6]

The couple had at six known children.

i.      Betsey Brown was born 23 January 1796; and died 26 January 1804.[7]

ii.      Aaron Brown was born 28 September 1797; and died 22 May 1798.[8] Aaron is buried in the Hill Cemetery, New Ipswich, New Hampshire.[9]

iii.      Addison Brown was born 11 March 1799;[10] and died 11 May 1872.[11] Addison married Ann Elizabeth Wetherbee, 13 December 1832.[12] Addison and Ann Elizabeth were buried in the Prospect Hill Cemetery, Brattleboro, Vermont.[13]

iv.      Hermon Brown was born 28 December 1800.[14] [See blog post http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=690]

v.      Mary Brown was born 14 February 1803;[15] and died 1 December 1837.  She married William Billings, 2 December 1835.[16]

vi.      John Stillman Brown was born 26 April 1806; died 1902; married Mary Ripley, 16 August 1836.[17] John and Mary are buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lawrence, Kansas.[18]

Future Research

  1. Search the Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, Index to Probate Records, 1771-1921[19] for reference to the Estate of Aaron Brown.
  2. Search for a map, with residence indicated, of New Ipswich and vicinity about 1830 or so.
  3. Sort through the numerous “Brown” deeds previously transcribed or abstracted to sort men with the same name and determine what property Aaron and Hannah Brown owned in New Ipswich and possibly in other parties of Hillsborough County.

 

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.



[1] Charles Henry Chandler and Sarah Fiske Lee, The History of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, 1735–1914, with Genealogical Records of the Principal Families (Fitchburg, Massachusetts: Sentinel Printing Company, 1914), 272. Hereinafter cited as History of New Ipswich.

[2] History of New Ipswich, 272; and New Ipswich Cemetery Records; Family History Center microfilm # 0015568 item 4.

[3] History of New Ipswich, 269.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Tombstone of Dea. Aaron Brown and tombstone of Hannah Brown, widow of Aaron Brown, Central Cemetery, New Ipswich, New Hampshire, viewed by the author, 10 August 1977.

[6] History of New Ipswich, 272.

[7] Ibid; and New Ipswich Town Records (n.p.: typescript, n.d.), 8; typescript in possession of the New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord, New Hampshire. Hereinafter cited as New Ipswich Town Records.

[8] Ibid.

[9] Tombstone of Aaron Brown, son of Aaron and Hannah Brown, viewed on FindAGrave.com, 20 March 2014.

[10] New Ipswich Town Records, 9.

[11] History of New Ipswich, 275.

[12] Ibid.

[13] Tombstone of Addison Brown and Ann Elizabeth Brown, viewed on FindAGrave.com, 20 March 2014.

[14] New Ipswich Vital Records, 9.

[15] New Ipswich Town Records, 9 where she is called “Polly.”

[16] New Ipswich Town Records, 88.

[17] New Ipswich Town Records, 9.

[18] Images of the Tombstones of John Stillman Brown and Mary Ripley Brown, FindAGrave.com, viewed 20 March 2014.

[19] Family History Library microfilm 0,016,069.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=692

Mar 17

52 Ancestors: #10 Hermon Brown

The 52 Weeks, 52 Ancestors, a challenge offered to genealogical bloggers by Amy Johnson Crow at the beginning of the year has proven to be an eye opener!  My ancestors were primarily New Englanders, arriving from England by 1650.  It is not easy to conduct research on the family during the last thirty years as I’ve been residing in Georgia. The infrequent trips back to New England are almost always spent visiting family members. My next trip will be extended so that I can explore cemeteries, county courthouses, and town halls. This exercise is forcing me to re-evaluate my research plans.

One of my ancestors that I know very little about (outside the mundane decennial census records) is my 2nd great grandfather, Hermon Brown. Hermon was farmer and a deacon of the Baptist Church in New Ipswich, New Hampshire,[1] were he was born, raised, and spent many adult years. Other than that, I know little of him.

He regularly appears in the federal census records, and in addition to the History New Ipswich, New Hampshire, 1735–1914 the family genealogy appears in the History of Canterbury, New Hampshire, 1727–1912.[2]

Hermon Brown was born 28 December 1800 in New Ipswich, to Aaron and Hannah (Brown) Brown; and died 23 August 1876 in Westminster, Massachusetts.[3] He married Sophronia Prescott, 13 April 1826.[4]

The couple had at least nine children.[5]

i.      Addison Prescott Brown, born 2 August 1827; married, 26 Dec 1850, Frances Louisa Chase.

ii.      Hannah Elizabeth Brown, born 21 May 1829; died. 14 September 1831.

iii.      Joseph Aaron Brown, born 8 May 1831; married 8 February 1854, Lucy A. Davis.

iv.      John Humphrey Brown, born 22 March 1834; died 23 February 1845.

v.      Mary Elizabeth Brown, born 16 March 1836; married, 21 May 1857, Charles H. Burrough.

vi.      Alfred Hermon Brown, born 14 July 1838; married, 20 January 1872, Margaret E. Gale.

vii.      George Stillman Brown, born 12 November 1840; died 11 December 1840.

viii.      Sophronia Eliza Brown, born, 20 August 1842; died 16 September 1842.

ix.      Hannah Eliza Brown, born 19 November 1843; died 13 September 1845.

Five of the nine children died young and are buried in Central Cemetery in New Ipswich: Hannah E., George S., Sophronia E., John H., and Hannah E. Hermon and Sophronia are also buried in Central Cemetery. [6]

Mary-Agnes Brown-Grover, a Brown descendant, had in her possession several letters sent between a variety of family members. We are fortunate that she transcribed the letters and the series of letters were published in several issues of the New England Historical Genealogical Register.  In the NEHGR dated July 1977, Hermon Brown was referenced: [7]

  • Letter from Addison Prescott Brown, Westminster, Vt., to Hermon Brown, New Ipswich, N.H., 26 December 1847.
  • Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Addison Prescott Brown, Bellows Falls, Vt., to Mr. and Mrs. Hermon Brown, New Ipswich, N.H., 1 February 1852.

Sometime in the early 1980s, I visited the town clerk’s office in New Ipswich. I no longer have the reference to her name or the location of her office (in her home on a farm in New Ipswich). I was allowed to look at the volumes of vital records found in her open safe, but she had no equipment to duplicate the copies nor was she willing to make copies for me.

In his History of Canterbury, Kidder includes a key to the “Occupants of Farms, Houses, Etc.” located on the foldout map in the front of his book (the map is not available in the scanned Google Books PDF file). None-the-less, “John Brown, Aaron Brown, Hermon Brown” are associated with Section B. Lot 181 “West of the Mountain,”[8] There is a work-around of the missing map—DavidRumsey.Com. In the Rumsey collection we find an 1892 map of New Ipswich[9] that includes name of homeowners. The map shows two mountains, Kidder Mountain and Barrett Mountain, but there are no homes illustrated on the west of either of those mountains. A map of New Ipswich has not been located in the digital map collection of the Library of Congress.

Federal Census records indicate that Hermon Brown and his wife removed from New Ipswich by 1860 when the family was enumerated in Paxton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.[10] The census indicates that he was a farmer owning property valued at $2000. His son, Alfred H. Brown, age 21, and mother-in-law, Elizabeth Goddard, age 81, were residing with Hermon and Sophronia.

Efforts to find Hermon or Sophronia in the 1870 U.S. census and Sophronia in 1880 have proved futile.[11]

Selected Future Research

  1. Search the deeds of Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, for Hermon Brown
  2. Return to New Ipswich and photograph the graves of Hermon and Sophronia Brown and their five children who died young.
  3. Return to New Ipswich and visit office of the town clerk to reconstruct a search of vital records I made in the early 1980s.
  4. Continue the search for the marriage record of Hermon Brown and Sophronia Prescott[12]
  5. Continue to search the 1870 for evidence of the residence of Hermon Brown and Sophronia (page by page if needed in New Ipswich, or possible residence of their children).
  6. Continue to search the 1880 for evidence of the residence of Sophronia.

 

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All rights reserved



[1] Charles Henry Chandler and Sarah Fiske Lee, The History of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, 1735–1914, with Genealogical Records of the Principal Families (Fitchburg, Massachusetts: Sentinel Printing Company, 1914), 275. Hereinafter cited as History of New Ipswich.

[2] James Otis Lyford, History of the Town of Canterbury, New Hampshire, 1727–1912 (Concord, New Hampshire: The Rumford Press, 1912), II: 46. Hereinafter cited as History of Canterbury.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Ibid.

[5] History of New Ipswich, 275–276.

[6] Tombstones viewed during the summer 1983 by the author.

[7] Mary-Agnes Brown-Grover, “From Concord, Massachusetts, to the Wilderness: The Brown Family Letters, 1792–1852,” New England Historical and Genealogical Society  (July 1977), 203–204.

[8] Frederic Kidder, and Augustus Addison Gould, The History of New Ipswich: from Its First Grant in MDCCXXXVI, to the Present Time (Boston: Gould and Lincoln, 1852), 279.

[9] D.H. Hurd & Co. Map of New Ipswich, Hillsborough Co. (with) New Ipswich P.O., town of New Ipswich. Boston, 1892; viewed at http://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RUMSEY~8~1~30897~1150831, 14 January 2014.

[10] 1860 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Worcester County, Massachusetts, page 565, Paxton, dwelling 66, family 83, lines 30–33; National Archives microfilm M653, reel 531.

[11] Ancestry.com and HeritageQuest Online indexes searched including spelling variations.

[12] A marriage record for Hermon Brown and Sophronia Prescott was not located at the New Hampshire Division of Vital Statistics in Concord, New Hampshire (1982); at the Massachusetts Division of Vital Records in Boston (1983); or among the numerous databases available on the New England Historical and Genealogical Society website (2013).

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=690

Mar 03

52 Ancestors: #9 – Alfred H. Brown

Alfred H. Brown

I never knew my great grandfather, Alfred H. Brown, he died in 1920 and his daughter, my maternal grandmother, rarely spoke of him. I always think of my great grandfather as a store keeper, but he had many facets to his life. Indeed he did own and run a general store in Canterbury, New Hampshire (it burned down about 1927 with several other structures, but was eventually rebuilt as a general store that was still in operations when I last visited the area in 1991).

BooksFromAHB_smI do know that my great grandfather was interested in his pedigree. Several of his books on county history have been passed on to me, including the History of Canterbury, New Hampshire, [1] The History of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, 1735–1914,[2] and Genealogies of the Old Families of Concord, Mass. And Their Descendants.[3] Thankfully, these histories have provided wonderful clues to what might have been a difficult family to search.

Alfred H. Brown was born in New Ipswich, New Hampshire, 14 July 1838, son of Hermon and Sophronia (Prescott) Brown.[4] He died 4 October 1921 as reference in the diary of his daughter, Alice M. Perkins by the following entries.

3 Oct 1921:  “Papa [Alfred H. Brown] looks very sick and I feel he will not last long.”

4 Oct 1921:  “Papa passed away about noon. “

Around 1861, Alfred and his brother, Joseph moved from New Ipswich to Canterbury where they formed a partnership and opened a general store. In 1868, Alfred bought his brother out and continued to run the general store until his death in 1921.[5]

Margaret Elizabeth Gale married Alfred H. Brown in Canterbury on 20 January 1872.[6] She was the daughter of Eliphalet and Mary Jane (Merrill) Gale.

The couple had four children all born and raised in Canterbury:

  1. Josephine Maud Brown, born 1 January 1873;[7] and died 24 November 1958.[8] Josephine, who never married, served as a librarian at the New Hampshire State Library for many years.
  2. Fred Hermon Brown, born 19 March, 1874,[9] and died 21 July 1947.[10] He married…
  3. Mary Prescott Brown, born 2 May 1877.[11] She married Richard A. Cody…
  4. Alice Margaret Brown, born 20 Feb 1886,[12] and died 4 June 1983.[13] She married Homer Lathe Perkins of Loudon, 8 April 1908 in Chester, New Hampshire.

Alfred and Margaret raised their family in a four-over-four colonial structure with an attached el and barn. His daughter, Alice (my grandmother) was born in the front right bedroom on the second floor (see image of their home, called The Maples, in my blog about Alice Margaret Brown).

Alfred and Margaret are buried in Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord, New Hampshire.

According to the History of the Town of Canterbury: [14]

No turmoil ever disturbed Mr. Brown and his record was never questioned, no matter how bitter the partisan strife of the day.  In the discharge of his duties he has ever been courteous, obliging and helpful; and as a public official, he has enjoyed the confidence of all parties. During the long winter evenings the store was the place where politics and current events were discussed.  No lyceum ever afforded more earnest debates and very few more entertainment.  The arguments of political speakers and the facts presented by public lecturers were here analyzed and dissected.  These gatherings night after night with their exchange of views contributed to make a Canterbury audience most critical, and he who came to address them was fortunate if his statements were not challenged by one of more of his hearers.  If these store discussions took an acrimonious turn, Mr. Brown had the happy faculty of changing the current of thought of his visitors.

 In 1862, be became postmaster of Canterbury and held that position for most of the years he had the store. Mr. Brown also served the community for many years as the town clerk of Canterbury.[15]

An article in The Granite Monthly, provided the following account of Alfred H. Brown:[16]

A.H. Brown is the A.T. Stewart of the town [Canterbury, N.H.].  For twenty years last past he has ministered to the corporal wants of Canterbury, dealing out the sweets and sours, attending to the clerkly business of the town, and devoting considerable attention to the improvement of an assorted breed of hogs.  He is not to the manor born, although his better half is [Margaret Gale]. His mercantile operations are not confined to the limited sphere of Canterbury. His energies have sought an outlet at the Weirs, where a branch store will be run at full blast the coming season.

The place at the Weirs reference in The Granite Monthly article immediately was a summer hotel called the “Aquedoktan House”, located 80 rods south of the train depot, where rooms could be found for $1.50 per day or $7 and $8 per Week.  Breakfast was served for 35¢, supper for 35¢, and dinner for 50¢.  Mr. Dennett was an apparent joint partner in this venture.  I do not know how many seasons the pair ran this hotel before it was burned to the ground.

Aquedoktan House

Aquedoktan House

Great grandfather also had an interest in pigs and establishing a better product. I’ve always enjoyed the following image of Alfred H. Brown and his prize winning hog.
Alfred H. Brown and his hog with Clarence S. GaleThe following image of Alfred and his wife, Margaret, was taken at the home of their daughter Mary Prescott (Brown) Cody in Newton Highlands, Massachusetts.
Alfred&Margaret© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.


[1] James Otis Lyford, History of the Town of Canterbury, New Hampshire, 1727-1912, 2 volumes (Concord, New Hampshire: The Rumford Press, 1912), hereinafter cited as History of the Town of Canterbury.

[2] Charles Henry Chandler, The History of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, 1735–1914 (Fitchburg, Massachusetts: Sentinel Printing Company, 1914), hereinafter cited as History of New Ipswich.

[3] Charles Edward Potter, editor, Genealogies of the Old Families of Concord, Mass. And Their Descendants in Part to the Present Generation, volume 1 (Boston: Alfred Mudge & Son, Printers, 1887).

[4]  History of the Town of Canterbury II: 46; and History of New Ipswich, 276.

[5] History of the Town of Canterbury I: 203.

[6] Brown-Gale Marriage Record, New Hampshire Bureau of Vital Records, Hazen Road, Concord, New Hampshire; History of the Town of Canterbury II: 46; and History of New Ipswich, 276

[7] History of the Town of Canterbury II: 46.

[8] Grave Marker of Josephine M. Brown, Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord, New Hampshire, viewed August 1993

[9] History of the Town of Canterbury II: 46.

[10] Grave Marker of Fred H. Brown, Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord, New Hampshire, viewed August 1993.

[11] History of the Town of Canterbury II: 47.

[12] History of the Town of Canterbury II: 47.

[13] Funeral Memorial Card for Alice M. Perkins, Arrangements by Foley Funeral Home, Keene, N.H. in possession of the author who also attended the funeral at the United Church of Christ in Keene, New Hampshire, 8 June, 1983.

[14] History of the Town of Canterbury I: 267.

[15] Alfred’s daughter, Alice M. (Brown) Perkins served for many years as the town clerk of Loudon, New Hampshire, and his granddaughter, Josephine (Perkins) Woodward served a term or two as the town clerk of Walpole, New Hampshire.

[16] The Granite Monthly, a New Hampshire Magazine, June, 1881, page 388.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=675

Feb 23

52 Ancestors: #8 Alice Margaret Brown

Alice M.B. Perkins, 1972

Alice M.B. Perkins, 1972

Nana Perkins was a big influence in my life. While we were growing up, my twin brother and I spent a lot of time at her home next to the Grange Hall in Loudon, New Hampshire. We never knew our grandfather Perkins—he died before we were born.

For many years she was the Loudon town clerk and local correspondent for the Concord Monitor, the weekly newspapers published in Pittsfield and Laconia. I recall her using a rickety old typewriter to record the town events such as vital records, fishing and hunting licenses, etc.

Nana Perkins was a big Red Sox fan, but listened to any game she could on her radio (before she owned a television set). Because her home was always open (I don’t recall that a door was every locked) to villagers, friends, and relatives, she occasionally felt a need to escape so no one would disturb her when an important baseball game was underway. When that happened, she put my brother and I in her car and drove us to a cemetery in a neighboring town. Once at the cemetery she’d ask Peter and I to get out of the car to play while she listened to the game on the car radio.

Following WWII our family moved in for a couple of years before my Dad got a job as a NH State Trooper and was transferred to the the Keene area. Peter and I started school in Loudon, we would walk up Main Street (now called South Village Road) in the village, past the library and over the Soucook River bridge and then up School Street to the one room school house.

It was Nana Perkins who originally got me involved in family history. She gave me a couple of town genealogy books that had belonged to her father and it wasn’t long before I was hooked. I think, however, my early days playing in cemeteries helped nudge me that in direction as well.

1952_LindaNana Perkins enjoyed using a needle and thread. She was always mending or piecing a quilt. It was Nana Perk who taught me to sew clothes. I remember sitting at her old Singer treadle machine when I was about ten years old making my very first outfit—a pair of shorts and halter-top made of printed blue cotton [see image at right].

1975_GrangeThe Grange was always a part of Nana’s life. She regularly attending meeting of the Grange in Loudon. In the image to the left she is pictured receiving a special award. That was in 1975 when she was 89 years old.

When we were young, she saw to it that Peter and I became members of the Juvenile Grange and when my family moved from Loudon to Walpole about 1947, members of the Juvenile Grange gave us a “Going Away” party complete with several Golden books.

Alice Margaret Brown was the youngest of four children born to Alfred H. and Margaret (Gale) Brown. She and her three siblings, Josephine, Fred, and Mary grew up in Canterbury, New Hampshire. Their family home was called The Maples. The images below show the house and barn about 1991.

TheMaples_02

The Maples

TheMaples_05

Barn attached to the “El” of The Maples

Oh, how I wish I had recorded the many stories she told me about her childhood.

Following her graduation from high school (I believe she attended the Keyser School in Canterbury, Alice taught school in Loudon where she roomed with the John Butters Perkins family. John’s son, Homer, and Alice were wed in Chester, N.H. by Albert E. Hall, on the 8th of April 1908. The couple resided in Loudon and had two daughters, Helen and Josephine.

 

 

Perkins-Brown_mar02Nana moved to Keene, N.H. in 1964 to live with her daughter Helen. When Helen passed in 1976, my Mom moved in to the cottage on Boston Place until Nana decided it was time she moved into a senior residence. Nana Perkins died in Westmoreland, New Hampshire, 4 Jun 1984, at the age of 97.

I really miss her even though she’s been gone so many years.

© Linda Woodward Geiger, All Rights Reserved.

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