Category Archive: Record Types

Jul 18

Military Monday: Final Pension Payment of Enoch Adams

While working at the National Archives in Washington, DC, in July 2010, I had the Final Pension Papers for Enoch Adams,  pulled (the Final Pension Papers for New Final Pension Payment Voucher for Enoch Adams had not been microfilm nor had digital images been prepared. There were four pages (or six folios) contained with in the file jacket.

In summary, the papers within the final pension packet illustrate that  Enoch Adams of New Hampshire had served as a private in the army of the Revolution. He received a pension for his natural live of eighty dollars a year paid twice a year: March 4th and September 4th. The pension commenced on 4th January 1831.

We also learn that Enoch son Russell was executor of Enoch’s estate and that he reported his father’s death to the pension office. Enoch died in Salisbury, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, 27 February 1842 and that he left no widow. His son Russell Woodward was executor of Enoch’s will. He had been a resident of Salisbury for forty-six years.

The documents found Enoch Adams Final Pension Payment[1] are digitized and presented below in the order which they appeared in the jacket.  Source: Enoch Adams, New Hampshire Revolutionary War Final Pension Payment Voucher, Box 1, Entry 722, Third Auditor’s Office, Records of the General Accounting Office (RG 217), National Archives Washington, DC


[1] Enoch Adams, New Hampshire Revolutionary War Final Pension Payment Voucher, Box 1, Entry 722, Third Auditor’s Office, Records of the General Accounting Office (RG 217), National Archives Washington, DC.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.
Linda@LindaGeiger.com

 

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=279

May 01

Urban Ancestors: Obtaining EDs for the 1940 Census in One Step

As you will notice, as of this date, the National Archives website provides five topics for the 1940 census: 1) General Information, 2) How to Start Your 1940 Census Research, 3) Indexes and Other Finding Aids, 4) Videos, and 5) Informative Articles and Online Data.

True confessions—When I discussed a process of finding urban families in my post dated the 26th of April I was hasty. I had not explored all of the avenues and suggestions on the National Archives website. Fortunately, Dr. Joel Weintraub noticed my shortcoming and he took the time to comment on that post and offer an easier alternative. The strategy that I had offered was based on suggestions offered in section 2, “How to Start Your 1940 Census Research.” So, like any good student, I went back to the drawing board and looked at all of the offerings on the National Archives website.

My goal is to find the families of 1) Nicholas Lorusso, residing in Worcester, Massachusetts, probably at 615 or 606 Franklin Street, and 2) Anthony Lorusso residing at 24 Orton Street.

“Indexes and Other Finding Aids”

Let’s zero in on the alternative, “Find Census Enumeration District Numbers” using Stephen P. Morse’s 1940 Search Engines”

 

 

Using “Obtaining EDs for the 1940 Census in One Step,” by Morse, Weintraub and Kehs,  I filled in the blanks as indicated below, I very quickly received the ED for 24 Orton Street, Worcester, Massachusetts.

I used the same procedure to obtain the 1940 ED for the address of for Franklin Street in Worcester. This was did not go quite as quickly—Orton St. is a short road (unpaved in 1970), but Franklin St. is a major artery in the city of Worcester encompassing ten EDs in 1940. Locating an intersecting street near 606 Franklin (Google maps quickly provided a couple of options: Putnam Lane and Villanova St. In 1940 Villanova St. was called “Villa Nova.”

By the way, the 1910-1940 Census in One Step also provides NARA microfilm series and reel number.

Most readers will be familiar with the wonderful website, One-Step Webpapes by  Steve Morse. The image below shows the current finding-aids available for the U.S population schedules for 1790–1940.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved
Linda@LindaGeiger.com

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=226

Apr 26

Getting Ready for the 1940 Census

It is almost time! The 1940 U.S. Population Schedule will be released in a little under one year (April 2012). In order to use the new record well, we need to study the parameters of the record as well as finding aids that will be available for us.

Did you know that the National Archives website has all of that information ready for our use as well as a blank copy of the 1940 census form? I’m using the information to begin constructing my research plan. What do I need to know before I tackle the records?

  • Who do I expect to find?
  • Where does each individual or family reside?
  • What is the enumeration district in which they reside?

My plan for locating my son’s paternal grandparents will contain the following:

Parents: Anthony and Loretta (Curran) Lorusso
Children: Nicholas, Shirley, Anthony, Peter, and Barbara
Address: 24 Orton Street, Worcester (Worcester County), Massachusetts
Note: Anthony and Loretta were married shortly after the 1930 census, so are not listed in a household together at that time. However, their sons  Nicholas and Anthony both told me that they had always lived at 24 Orton Street. I will need to explore the National Archives microfilm T1224 (Descriptions of Census Enumeration Districts, 1830-1950) to learn the number of the enumeration district.

Anthony Lorusso’s parents, Nichola and Antoinette resided at 606 Franklin Street, Worcester, in 1930. Since they were still living in 1940, I expect to find them at the same address. In 1930, 615 Franklin Street was in enumeration district 14-58 (the 14 represents Worcester County). In 1920, the family had resided at 606 Franklin Street, enumeration District 246. It is unknown whether the family physically moved between the 1920 and 1930 census or whether the street numbers were changed.

Stephen P. Morse (with Drs. Joel Weintraub and David Kehs) has a splendid tool called “Converting between 1920 and 1930 (or 1930 and 1940) Census EDs in One Step.” Using this conversion tool, if Nichola Lorusso resided in ED 14-58 in 1930, then I expect to find him in one of these three enumeration districts in 1940: 23-79, 23-80, or 23-81.

It will take a little work, but I expect to be successful!

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved
linda@lindageiger.com

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=219

Apr 11

Military Monday: Daniel Russell Woodward in Co. E, 16th N.H. Regiment

My Great Grandfather Daniel Russell Woodward served with Company E (Captain Jonathan P. Sanborn’s Company) in the 16th New Hampshire Regiment, N.H. Volunteers. According to his Certificate of Disability found within his pension application [file #WC-711-973, National Archives, Washington, D.C.]. Daniel R. was enlisted by Sanborn on 12 September 1962 to serve 9 months. Following an accident in camp where he fell on a tree stump, he was listed as unfit for duty and and given a certificate of disability for discharge on the 27th April 1863 at New Orleans, Louisiana, where he received a disability discharge from A.W. Smyth MD.

 

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.
linda@lindageiger.com

 

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