Category Archive: Woodward Family

May 23

52 Ancestors: #18 Oscar H Woodward Jr

OscarHWoodward002

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=731

Feb 20

52 Ancestors: #7 Stephen Woodward

Stephen Woodward, a poor man with little means of support. His origins is questionable and his death date and place continue to remain a mystery.

Primary Records

Stephen Woodward and his wife Hannah, and infant son, Eliphalet, were warned out of Plaistow, New Hampshire, on 17 April 175 and told to return to Haverhill in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts from which they had come.[1] When I first saw the warning out at the New Hampshire State Archives, my first thought was, “My gosh, what knowledge or rumors of skullduggery had preceded Stephen and his small family to Plaistow (originally part of Haverhill).”

It is important that family historians take time to learn some of the law that will relate to their family. In this instance I needed to learn about “Warnings Out of Town.” During the early European settlement of this county, it was the town or Parish that looked after the poor. New England towns were no exception and it is reasonable that the town inhabitants were not keen about looking after poor folks who came into town with no visible means of support. So, you see, the only “crime” committed by Stephen and his small family was that of being poor.

Stephen Woodward married Hannah Clement about 1757, perhaps in Essex County in the province of Massachusetts. Hannah was born 24 March 1732, daughter of Jonathan Clement and Sarah Watts (married 2 March 1729/30[2]), in Haverhill, Massachusetts[3]

Evidence in the Plaistow town records indicates that the family remained in Plaistow until at least 1779 when their 9th child, Tamar, was born.

All known children of Stephen and Hannah were registered with the town of Plaistow.[4]

Eliphlet, born 28 May 1758, Haverhill

Stephen, born 11 May 1760, Plaistow

Edna, born 2 September 1762, Plaistow

James, born 26 June 1765, Plaistow

Hannah, born 26 July 1767, Plaistow

Bettey, born 4 September 1769, Plaistow

Sarah, born 25 February 1772, Plaistow

Jesse, born 24 June 1774, Plaistow

Tamar, born 19 September 1779, Plaistow

The Town Records of Plaistow provide information about some of the events of Stephen’s life there.

  1. In 1762, Stephen Woodward a laborer of Plaistow was sued for a debt owed to Samuel White (Stephen had signed the note so we know though poor, he was literate).[5]
  2. “An order given to Stephen Woodard on Constable Cheney for ten Shilings and Eleven pence it being a batment of his years rates he being not of age.”[6]
  3. An order given to Stephen Woodward on Constable Eaton for one pound tens Shillings L.M. it being for his making a coffing and diging a grave for Potter.”[7]
  4. “An order given to Stephen Woodard on Constable Eaton for seven pound fourteen Shilling L.M. it being for a ballance Due to him for his son? going to new york.”[8]

It is apparent that Stephen Woodward did not (or could not) honor his agreements.

Samuel White sued Stephen Woodward in March 1762 for failure to honor an agreement. The case: Samuel White (Plaintiff), adversus Stephen Woodward (Defendant), March 1762.[9]  The case involved a note dated in Haverhill, April 16, 1761:

I Stephen Woodward of Plastow

Labourer promise to pay Samuel White

on order five pounds Six Shill

ings and Eight pence Lawfull mony

mony by the twenty first day of aprill

kostant[?] with Interest for Delay for value

Recieved as witness my hand

5:6:8              [Signed] Stephen Woodward

On the 13th February 1762, the court ordered the Sheriff of the Province of New-Hampshire

“to attach the Goods or Estate of Stephen Woodward of Plastow, Labourer within our Province of New Hampshire, to the Value of fifty Pounds, and for want thereof to take the Body of the said Stephen Woodward (if he may be found in your Precinct) and him safely keep so that you have him before our Justices of our Inferiour Court of Common Pleas, next to be holden at Portsmouth, within and for our said Province of New Hampshire, on the first Tuesday in March next, then and there in our said Court to Answer unto Samuel White of Havehill in the County of Essex & province of the Massachusetts Bay Esqr in an action of the Case for that whereas the Defendant at a place called Haverhill in plastow aforesaid on the 16th Day of Aprill A:D: 1761 by his note of hand of that Date by him Signed promised the plantiff to pay him on order five pound six Shillings & Eight pence Lawfull mony by the Twenty first day of the same aprill with Interest for Delay for value Received yet the Defendant though requested hath not paid the same to this day but detanes it Said sum being to the value of Twenty six pounds fourteen Shillings New tenor bills of the province of New hampshire aforesaid with interest as aforesaid yet the defendant tho: Requested, hath not paid the same nor the value there of to this Day but injustly Detaines it.”

It was ordered that “forty” pounds damages be paid to Samuel White.

Authored books

Harold Edward Woodward would have us believe that, Stephen4 Woodward (Ezekiel3, Ezekiel2, Nathaniel1) was born at Gloucester, Massachusetts, 9 March 1771. Stephen married Hannah Clement and they had children: Eliphalet, born 28 May 1758; and Stephen, born May 1761.

Unfortunately, Harold Woodward’s book on the descendants of Nathaniel Woodward is not well documented, and has been used as a reference by many others who have written about Woodward families of New England.

According to the vital records of Gloucester, Massachusetts, a Stephen was born 9 March 1716, to Ezekiel and Hannah Perkins[10]

We know that Stephen Woodward did marry Hannah Clement about 1757 as evidenced in the Plaistow Town Records. However, Harold Woodward lists only two of the couples nine children, the oldest, Eliphalet, was born 28 May 1758. I have a problem with this scenario by Harold Woodward. If Stephen was the son of Ezekiel and Hannah Woodward born 9 March 1716/17 married Hannah Clement, then he would have been about forty-one or forty-two years old when his son Eliphalet was born—obviously not impossible, but I think that is unlikely that this is the Stephen that married Hannah Clement. I’ve found no evidence of a prior marriage for Hannah’s husband. I suspect that there may be a missing generation and research continues.

 



[1] Province of New Hampshire, Loose Records of the Inferior Court at Portsmouth, file #06332, New Hampshire State Archives, Concord, New Hampshire.

[2] Vital Records of Haverhill, Massachusetts, to the End of the Year 1849, 2 volumes (Topsfield, Massachusetts: Topsfield Historical Society, 1911), II: 67; hereinafter cited as Vital Records of Haverhill.

[3] Vital Records of Haverhill, I: 67.

[4] State of New Hampshire, Plaistow Town Records, Volume 1: 1736–1801, page 401; Family History Library, microfilm 15,281, item 1.

[5] Province of New Hampshire, Loose Records of the Inferior Court at Portsmouth, file #06332, New Hampshire State Archives, Concord, New Hampshire; and Plaistow Town Records, Volume 2: 16.

[6] Plaistow Town Records, Volume 2: 109.

[7] Plaistow Town Records, Volume 2: 115.

[8] Plaistow Town Records, Volume 2: 116,

[9] Province of New-Hampshire Inferiour Court at Portsmouth, Docket No. 6332, New Hampshire State Archives, Concord, New Hampshire.

[10] Vital Records of Gloucester, Massachusetts, to the End of the Year 1849, 2 volumes (Topsfield, Massachusetts: Topsfield Historical Society, 1917–1924), I: 792.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=647

Feb 02

52 Ancestors: #6 Jesse Woodward

I know little of my 3rd great grandfather, Jesse Woodward, father of Daniel S. Woodward. However, I do have some clues that needed to be followed when I have an opportunity. Perhaps some of those objectives can be made next week when I’m at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.

Jesse Woodward was born in Plaistow, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, 24 June 1774, son of Stephen Woodward and Hannah Clement.[1]  Stephen Woodward was a poor man with little means of support when he, with his wife Hannah, and infant Eliphalet, were warned out of Plaistow, New Hampshire, to return to Haverhill in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts from which they had come in 1759.[2] Evidence in the Plaistow town records indicate that the family stayed in Plaistow until at least when Jesse’s youngest sibling was born in 1779. In 1762, Stephen Woodward a laborer of Plaistow was sued for a debt owed to Samuel White (Stephen had signed the note so we know though poor, he was literate).[3]

Jesse married Bashabe Stevens,[4] allegedly in Springfield, New Hampshire, about 1800, but no principal evidence has been found for the marriage. A Jesse Woodward paid a poll tax in Springfield, New Hampshire in 1803. No record has been located for Jesse Woodward after the 1803 tax record, and he has never been specifically located on any federal census record.

Family tradition indicates that as a young adult he went to Rumford, Maine, where he died. Extensive search in the recrods of Rumford and Oxford County, Maine, in 1996 were fruitless.  No reference to Jesse has been located in the vital records of Rumford, Maine, or the probate records of Oxford County, Maine.

It would appear that Jesse Woodward died before 1837 when Bashabe is called “widow” Woodward.

In 2011 I found a death notice in the New Hampshire Patriot that stated that a Jesse Woodward, age 60, died in Springfield, New Hampshire.[5] Finally a fairly substancial clue to pursue.

Bashabe Stevens is first located in the New Hampshire deeds in 1837 when she, a resident of Salisbury, New Hampshire, widow woman, purchased about an acre of land in Boscawen, New Hampshire, from Kimball Woodward.[6] In 1846 she conveyed that property in Boscawen, New Hampshire, to her son-in-law Ezekiel Davis.[7] At the time she was residing in Lowell, Mass., probably with her daughter and son-in-law. Bashabe, who died at the age of 84, is buried in Franklin, New Hampshire, in the plot of her son Daniel S. Woodward. It is not known whether she died in Lowell, Massachusetts, or near Franklin, New Hampshire.

Jesse Woodward and Bashabe Stevens had at least two children:

  1. Daniel Saunders Woodward
  2. Diana A. Woodward (mar. Ezekiel S. Davis). In 1864 Diana probably resided in Lowell, Middlesex Co., Mass.

Jesse and Bashabe may have also been the parents Kimball Woodward (born about 1802; and died in 1845).

 



[1] Plaistow, New Hampshire, Town Records, Vol. 1: 401, Family History Library microcopy #15, 281.

[2] Warning out of Stephen Woodward, file “Warnings Out 1759,” Province of New Hampshire, New Hampshire State Archives.

[3] Province of New Hampshire, Loose Records of the Inferior Court at Portsmouth, file #06332, New Hampshire State Archives, Concord, New Hampshire.

[4] Daniel S. Woodward named his parents as Jesse Woodward born in Plaistow, New Hampshire, and Bashabe Stevens, born in Springfield, New Hampshire [Marriage Return of Daniel S. Woodward and Lucy (Spaulding) Staples [his second marriage], New Hampshire Department of Vital Records and Statistics, Hazen Road, Concord, New Hampshire.]

[5] New Hampshire Patriot 26 November 18632; viewed on GenealogyBank.com, 12 December 2011.

[6] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 53: 26, Family History Library microcopy 16,137.

[7] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 83: 190, County Clerk’s Office, Concord, New Hampshire.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=641

Feb 02

52 Ancestors: #5 Daniel S. Woodward

We should not simply collect records that we think belong to our ancestors (or potential ancestors) and squirrel them away in a box, file cabinet, or whatever. It is so important that we put every one of those documents through the wringer and analysis, analysis, analysis. I learned my lesson the hard way.

Of course the fact that during the past twenty years I’ve spent most of my research hours on historical and genealogy projects that relate to the south of the Mason Dixon line, Like the cobbler whose children have no shoes, my personal genealogical research has been very space.

In order to better understand my progress (or lack thereof) on my research relating to my 2nd great grandfather, Daniel S. Woodward, I’ve gone through my files and really looked at the documents I have on file.  Almost immediately I saw things that completed escaped under the radar screen during past research endeavors.

Daniel S. Woodward was born about 1804 (probably in New Hampshire), the son of Jesse Woodward and Bashabe Stevens. [1] Daniel married, first, in Salisbury, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, on 8 July 1828,[2] Dorcas Adams,[3] daughter of Enoch Adams and Elizabeth Russell. Daniel married, second, Lucy (Spaulding Staples) in Franklin, New Hampshire, on 14 June 1879.[4]

Dorcas Adams was born 19 July 1797 or 1796[5] probably in the area of Salisbury, New Hampshire. Dorcas Adams was killed in Hill, New Hampshire, from falling debris of a barn when a strong storm caused the barn to collapse.[6]

Daniel died 18 January 1892, Intestate, and his widow, Lucy, choose George R. Stone to administrate his estate.[7]

Daniel S. Woodward and Dorcas Adams had at least ten children:

  1. Elisabeth Woodward, b. 22 Sep 1828; mar. John Pollard 3 Sep 1854; d. 23 Dec 1876.
  2. Hannah S. Woodward, b. 1 Nov 1830; mar. Perley Dickerson 16 Aug 1869
  3. Phoebe Woodward, b. 1 Nov 1830; mar. George Howe; d. 21 Apr 1897
  4. Daniel Russell Woodward, b. 10 Apr 1833; mar. 30 Jan 1854 Laura Davis; d. 6 Jan 1910 [see 52 Ancestors - #4]
  5. Stephen Adams Woodward, b.  22 Aug 1834; mar. Nancy Morrill 9 Jun 1856; d. 22 Sep 1924
  6. Alvin A. Woodward, b. 22 May 1836; mar Ellen M. Marden, 18 Jun 1859; d. 22 Oct 1905.
  7. Dorcas Catherine Woodward, b. 22 Feb 1838; mar. Edwin E. Clark, 4 July 1859; d. 10 Oct 1927
  8. Diane Woodward, b. 22 Sep 1839; mar., 1st,  Benjamin Morrill, 1 Mar 1860; mar, 2nd, William H. Roberts, 27 Aug 1865
  9. Perlena Ann Woodward, b. Aug 1842; d. 8 Oct 1844
  10. Francis Ross Woodward, b. 9 Feb 1845; mar., 1st,  Lydia Gordon; mar., 2nd, Ella E. Hilpert, 29 Mar 1886

Oliver A. Woodward, a 24 years old stone Mason was residing with Daniel S. Woodward in 1850,[8] and appeared as the oldest child (third entry) prior to Daniels’s known children, Elisabeth, Hannah, Phebe, Dorcus, Stephen, Alvin, Dorcas, Frank, and Dinah. At first blush it would appear that Oliver was the older son of Daniel S. However, when we compare this census to the1840 census entry for the household of Daniel S. Woodward[9] there appears to be a problem.

Partial abstract of the Daniel S. Woodward household in the 1850 Census

Name Age Occupation Probable age bracket in 1840
Daniel S. Woodward 54 Stone Mason
Dorcus Woodward 52
Oliver A. Woodward 24 Stone Mason 10 to 15
Elisabeth 22 10 to 15
Hannah 19 5 to 10
Phebe 18 5 to 10
Daniel R. 17 Stone Mason 5 to 10
Stephen 16 Stone Mason 5 to 10
Alvin 13 Under 5
Dorcus 11 Under 5
Francis [Frank] 6 [not yet born]
Dinah 11 Under 5

Partial abstract of the Daniel S. Woodward entry in 1840

Age Group # of males # of females
Under 5 1 [Alvin] 2 [Dorcus & Dinah]
5 & under 10 2 [Daniel R & Steven] 2 [Hannah & Phebe]
10 & under 15 1 [Elisabeth]
15 & under 20
20 & under 30
30 & under 40 1
40 & under 50 1
50 & under 60
60 & under 70
70 & under 80
80 & under 90 1

There seems to be some condtradictions between the two decennial census records. For instance, if Oliver is a son of Daniel S., and his age is somewhat correct in the 1850, then why isn’t he enumerated in Daniel’s household in 1840. Who is the 70 to 80 year old male in Daniel’s home in 1840? The first question is not easy to answer, but the second is, but indirectly. Enoch Adam (father-in-law of Daniel) was a Revolutionary Pensior [I’ll save discussion of Enoch for a future blog]. Although I have little evidence to date, I expect that Oliver was son of Kimball Woodward, supposed brother of Daniel. Kimball Woodward met his death by drowning in 1845. It is not unreasonable to assume that Daniel was training his apparent nephew, Oliver, to be a stone mason.

The 1850 census indicates that Daniel S. Woodward had $ 1,200  worth of real estate. Subsequent deed work produced ten property conveyances in Merrimack County. Abstracts appear heree.

  1. Date of conveyance: 1 November 1832; date recorded: 24 April 1834
    Daniel S. Woodward purchased land in Salisbury, for consideration of $20 from James Johnson (both men were of Salisbury, Merrimack County).
    Description: A certain piece of land lying in said Johnson [sic] Salisbury, it being a part of lot number forty one in the third range and is bounded as follows: Beginning at stake and Woodard stones standing eight feet north of the northwest corner of a house built by Joseph Webster, thence south ten rods to a stake & stones, thence east eight rods to stake and stones, thence north ten rods to stake & stones, and thence west eight rods to the first mentioned bounds to contain eight rods (Deed is to convey the premises as they were in 1828).
    Signed: James Johnson
    Witnesses: Joshua S. Bean and Benjamin Scribner proved the deed on 1 November 1832.[10]
  2. Date of conveyance: 20 December 1838; date recorded 27 December 1838.
    Ira Sweatt of Boscawen, yeoman, convey to Kimball Woodward, yeoman, also of Boscawen, for consideration of $485.
    Description: land with buildings on the same where I now live situate in said Boscawen containing six acres be the same more or less and bounded easterly on Blackwater River southerly on land of Isaac T. Sweatt, westerly on a highway and northerly on land of Richard P. Shattuck reserving the same privilege to Silas Sweatt as is reserved in my deed from him, reference thereto being had….
    Signed: Ira Sweatt
    Witness: Moses Fellows and Hezh Fellows[11]
  3. Date of conveyance: 7 April 1834; date recorded: 24 April 1834
    Daniel S. Woodard sold to Kimbell Woodard, gentleman, (both of Salisbury, Merrimack Co., NH) for the sum of $40
    Description: A certain piece of land lying in Salisbury, it being a part of lot No. forty one in the third range and is bounded as follows: beginning at stake and stones standing eight feet north of the northwest corner of a house built by Joseph Webster, thence south ten rods to a stake & stones, thence east eight rods to stake and stones, then north ten rods to stake & stones,  and thence west eight rods to the first mentioned bounds to contain eighty rods same more or less.
    Signed: Daniel S. Woodward (his mark)
    Witnesses: Joshua S. Bean & Samuel Smith[12]
  4. Date of conveyance 4 November 1839; date recorded 17 June 1840
    Conveyance from John L. Eaton, yeoman, of Salisbury to Kimball Woodward, yeoman, of Boscawen, for consideration of $1,000.
    Description: “…a certain piece of land situate in Salisbury aforesaid and bounded as follows. viz. Beginning at Boscawen line on the westerly side of mutton road so called & running on said road northerly one hundred and forty rods to a stake and stones: thence south one & a half degrees west, one hundred & ten & a half rods to a stake & stones thence south seventy five degrees west fifty-six rods to land owned by Pearce Fellows thence on said Fellows line southerly forty six rods to Boscawen line thence on said line easterly to the corner first mentioned containing seventy two & a half acres be the same more or less. Reserving the Saw Mill situate on the premises with the privileges and appurtenances thereunto belonging agreeably to an indenture & obligation made by me with Pearce Fellows of said Salisbury dated the twenty fourth day of January 1839 & Recorded in the Merrimack Records Lib. 57. Fol page 73[?] Reserving also a passage way for teams from the highway by the Saw mill to the land down beyond ~  …”
    Lousy B. Eaton, wife of John L. Eaton relinquished her dower rights.
    Signed: John L. Eaton and Lousy B. Eaton
    Witnesses: Valentine Little and Stephen Dearborn[13]
  5. Date of conveyance: 17 April 1841; date recorded: 27 April 1841
    Daniel S. Woodward purchased property from Nathan Kilburn (both of Boscawen, Merrimack Co., NH) for $450.
    Description: A certain tract or parcel of land situate in said Boscawen, containing twenty-five acres, be the same more or less, bounded as follows, viz. on the east by the highway leading from the end of Pleasant Street in Boscawen to the South road village in Salisbury, on the south by land of Benjamine Smith, on the west by land of Gailand Caleb, and on the north by the line of the town of Boscawen, excepting one acre of land now owned by Kimball Woodward, and as the same tract of land and building conveyed to me by said Kimball Woodward by deed dated the tenth day of February 1838.
    Polly Kilburn, wife of Nathan signed, thus relinquishing her dower rights.
    Signed: Nathan Kilborn and Polly O. Kilburn
    Witnesses: John Fellows, James S. Fellows and proven by Hezh Fellows, Justice Peace[14]
  6. Date of conveyance: 23 April 1844; date recorded: 25 June 1844.
    William C. Little of Salisbury sold to Daniel S. Woodward of Boscawen for Eighty dollars
    Description: a certain piece of land situated in Salisbury in said county of Merrimack being a part of lot numbered twenty one in the first range of Salisbury and bounded as follows, viz; on the west by the road and on the north east and south by land of Thomas[?]R. Little containing one and a half acre, be the same more or less, meaning to convey the same which was bequeathed to me by my grandmother, Mary Little, late of said Salisbury, deceased.
    Signed: William C. Little
    Witnesses: John Little and Joseph Hooper[15]
  7. Date of conveyance: 13 November 1846; date recorded: 1 December 1846.
    Bashabee Woodward of Lowell, Middlesex County, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, widow, to Ezekiel Davis (also of Lowell) for consideration of one dollar and the kind attention and support of me by the said Ezekiel S. Davis since his intermarriage with my daughter Diana A. Woodward
    Description: a certain piece of land with the buildings thereon, situated in Boscawen Merrimack Co., NH, containing one area be the same more or less bounded and described as follows: Beginning at the northeast corner of a piece of land conveyed to Kimball Woodward by Samuel D. Couch, it being the a part of the Enoch Gilbert farm, so called, lying on the west side by the road leading from the fourth New Hampshire Turnpike road in Salisbury to Pleasant Street in Boscawen, thence on said road southerly twenty rods, then westerly eight rods, thence northerly twenty rods on a line parallel with said road, and then easterly eight rods to the point of beginning containing one hundred sixty square rods more or less, being the same land conveyed to me by Kimball Woodward of said Boscawen by his deed dated 31 July 1837 and recorded in Merrimack Records Lib 52 Fol 26 to which said deed and record thereof reference may be made.
    Signed Bashabee Woodward (her mark)
    Witnesses: James Hopkins & Wm. F. Smith[16]
  8. Date of conveyance: 15 June 1847
    Nancy George, widow of True George of Salisbury, to Nancy Woodward for $150
    Description: a certain tract of land situate in Boscawen in said county of Merrimack containing one acre by measure with a dwelling house,  wood shed, and barn thereon and bounded as follows, beginning at a post & stone standing on the west side of the highway leading from Salisbury south road to Comser[?] Hill so called at the north east corner of said land, thence westerly along by the north side of said buildings and parallel with said house until it strikes a line parallel with the east side of barn standing on land of ?? Woodman & containing the same on the same
    Signed: True George
    Witnessed by: Nathan Smith and John Smith and proven 15 Jun 1847.[17]
  9. Date of Conveyance: 6 May 1850; date recorded: 7 May 1850
    Ezekiel S. Davis, of Lowell, Middlesex Co., Mass., to Bashabee Woodward, also of Lowell, for consideration of $100
    Description: a certain tract of land with the building thereon situated in Boscawen in the county of Merrimack, containing one acre, described as follows: to wit beginning at the northeast corner of a piece of land conveyed to Kimball Woodward by Samuel D. Couch it being a part of the Enoch Gilbert farm so called lying on the west side of the road leading from the fourth New Hampshire Turnpike road in Salisbury to Pleasant Street in Boscawen, thence on said road southerly twenty rods, thence westerly eight rods, thence northerly twenty rods on a line parallel with said road, thence easterly eight rods to the point of the beginning containing one hundred and sixty square rods more or less, being the same convey to Bashabee Woodward by Kimball Woodward by deed dated 31 July 1837 and recorded in Merrimack Register Lib 53 Fol 26 and afterwards conveyed to me by said Bashabee by deed dated 30 Nov 1846 and recorded in Merrimac Records Lib 83 Fol 190.
    Signed: Ezekiel S. Davis
    Witnesses: W.P. Webster and William Standish.[18]

10. Conveyance date: 22 November 1852; recorded 10 January 1853
Basheba Woodward of Springfield, Sullivan Co., NH, to Silas Rolins, also of Springfield.for consideration of $100
Description: A certain piece or parcel of land situated in Boscawen Merrimack County and State aforesaid and containing one acre by measure and bounded as follows viz Beginning at the north east corner of a piece of land deeded to Kimball Woodward by Samuel D. Couch it being a part of the Enoch Elliot farm so called laying on the west side of the road leading from the 4th N.N. Turnpike so called in Salisbury to pleasant Street in Boscawen thence on said road Southerly twenty rods thence Easterly eight rods thence northerly twenty rods on a parallel line with the aforesaid road, thence Easterly eight rods to the first mentioned bound containing one hundred and sixty square rods or one acre as aforesaid
Signed: Basheba Woodward
Witnesses: Daniel N. Adams and Moses N. Loverin[19]

 

Future Research:

  1. Determine the birth place of Daniel S. Woodward.
    Was he born in Oldfield, Maine[20] (or elsewhere in Maine[21]); in Springfield, New Hampshire (or elsewhere in New Hampshire[22]); or was he born in Vermont?[23]
  2. Was Kimball Woodward a sibling of Daniel S. Woodward?
  3. Search for obituaries of Daniel S. Woodward,  Dorcas (Adams) Woodward, and Lucy (Spaulding Staples) Woodward.
  4. Search for the distribution of the estate of Daniel S. Woodard.
  5. Search for the distribution of the estate of Dorcas (Adams) Woodward and from whence she gained her real property.

 

 


[1] Daniel S. Woodward named his parents as Jesse Woodward born in Plaistow, New Hampshire, and Bashabe Stevens, born in Springfield, New Hampshire [Marriage Return of Daniel S. Woodward and Lucy (Spaulding) Staples [his second marriage], New Hampshire Department of Vital Records and Statistics, Hazen Road, Concord, New Hampshire.]

[2] Salisbury, New Hampshire, Town Records, 1797–1845: 54; Family History Library microfilm 16,503.

[3] Salisbury, New Hampshire, Town Records, Vol. 1: 955, New Hampshire State Library microcopy.

[4] Marriage Return of Daniel S. Woodward and Lucy (Spaulding) Staples [his second marriage], New Hampshire Department of Vital Records and Statistics, Hazen Road, Concord, New Hampshire.

[5] The death year inscribed for Dorcas on the Woodward tombstone in Franklin Cemetery is 1796.

[6] Family tradition relayed by Douglas Woodward, great-grandson of the Dorcas (Adams) Woodward, on 29 September 1991, to Linda Woodward Geiger and tombstone of Daniel S. Woodward and family members, Franklin Cemetery, Franklin, New Hampshire, photographed by Linda Woodward Geiger, 29 September 1991.

[7] Probate record of Daniel S. Woodward, file #14598; Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Probate Court, Concord, New Hampshire.

[8] Famiy for Daniel S. Woodward, 1850 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Boscawen, Merrimack County, New Hampshire,  dwelling 110, family 110, National Archives micropublication M432, reel 436.

[9]  Enry for Danal S. Woodward, 1840 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Salisbury, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 137A, line 18; National Archives microfilm M704, reel 240.

[10] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 36: 543; Family History Library microfilm #16,128.

[11] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 55: 209; Family History Library microfilm #16,138.

[12] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 36: 544; Family History Library microfilm #16,128.

[13] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 62: 237, Family Hisotry Library microfilm #16,142.

[14] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 65: 228; Family History Library microfilm #16,112.

[15] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 76: 188; Family History Library microfilm #16,149.

[16] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 83: 190; Merrimack County Clerk’s Office, Concord, New Hampshire.

[17] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 94: 48; Family History Library microfilm #16,158.

[18] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 98: 429; Merrimack County Clerk’s Office, Concord, New Hampshire.

[19] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 115: 36; Merrimack County Clerk’s Office, Concord, New Hampshire.

[20] Delayed Marriage Record of Daniel R. Woodward and Laura Davis, recorded in Franklin, New Hampshire, 19 October 1910, New Hampshire Department of Vital Records and Statistics, Hazen Road, Concord, New Hampshire.

[21] Entry for Frank R. Woodward, 1880 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Hill, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 322A, dwelling 142, family 150; National Archives micropublication T9, Reel 766.

[22] Entry for Alvin Woodward, 1880 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Hill, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 320A, dwelling 93, family 98; National Archives micropublication T9, Reel 766; Entry of Daniel S. Woodward, 1850 U.S. Census, Free Population  Schedule, Boscawen, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 258B, dwelling 110, family 110; National Archives micropublication M432, reel 436; and entry of Daniel S. Woodward, 1870 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Hill, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 331B, dwelling 102, family 99; National Archives micropublication M593, reel 846..

[23] Entry for Daniel S. Woodward, 1860 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Franklin, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 1042, dwelling 733, family 732; National Archives micropublication M653, Reel 677.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=634

Jan 19

52 Ancestors: #4 Daniel R. Woodward

There are some things you don’t publish until certain family members have passed on. There is no need to spoil the image of their grandfather who they considered a hero of the Civil War because we was wounded and eventually discharged prior the surrender of General Robert E. Lee to General U.S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865. The truth is Daniel R. Woodward received his injuries when he fell over a stump in Camp.

Daniel’s federal Civil War Invalid pension application provides a great deal of information about his enlistment.[1] We learn that

Daniel R Woodward served under Col. James Pike, Company E, 16th New Hampshire Infantry. When Daniel enlisted at Franklin, New Hampshire on 12 September 1862 for 9 months he was described as a thirty-nine year old man who stood five feet nine and on-half inches tall, had a light complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair. He was a stonecutter by trade. Daniel was mustered into service as a private, 23 October 1862 at Concord, New Hampshire. Muster rolls for the unit indicate that he was present in January and February, 1863; present, March and April 1863; and sick in hospital at New Orleans since March 6th. The muster our roll dated 20 August 1863 reports him discharged at Charity Hospital in New Orleans and he was given a certificate of disability.

While on night guard duty at Camp Parapet near Carrollton, Louisiana, Daniel sustained injuries to a knee and ankle when he fell over a stump in camp about the 25th of January 1863. He was discharged, 3 May 1863 at Charity Hospital, New Orleans. Daniel also claimed that subsequent to the fall he had suffered chronic diarrhea and rheumatism. In an affidavit dated 26 April 1881, Daniel listed of, no less than, twenty-six times that he had been incapacitated for a period of five to thirty or more days in succession when he was sick.

Daniel Russell Woodward was born 10 April 1833 in Salisbury, Merrimack County, New Hampshire,[2] son of Daniel S and Dorcas (Adams) Woodward.[3]

I’ve just found a copy of the History of the Sixteenth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers.[4] I’m looking forward to reading it. Hopefully, I’ll learn how the 16th NH traveled from New Hampshire to Louisiana.

A copy of a delayed marriage record is located within Daniel’s pension record. The delayed record was recorded in Concord, New Hampshire and stated that the marriage was conducted in Lowell, Massachusetts. For years I sought, to no avail, for that marriage record in Lowell (and nearby communities), and the Massachusetts state vital records. I searched every variant spelling of Woodward, but I never searched the indexes for the bride, Laura Davis until late August of 2005. I remember that day well, because while I was going over my lecture notes on the Lowell Mill Girls for a presentation later in the day at the FGS annual conference in Boston, I took a break. I think Laura was sending me a message telling me to forget Daniel and search for her. Eureka!  The surname of Daniel and his father were recorded as “Woodbury” and not Woodward. I originally located the record at NewEnglandAncestors.com

Daniel Woodward and Laura Davis were married in Lowell, Massachusetts, 30 January 1854, by Baptist clergyman, Rev. Howe. Laura, a resident of Franklin, New Hampshire, was the daughter of Lewis and Nancy [Glines] Davis. [5] Family tradition indicates that Daniel and Laura were working at the mills in Lowell, Massachusetts, when they wed. This is probably so, since “operative” appears as an occupation on the Lowell marriage register.

Laura and Daniel had eight children. In an affidavit on 6 July 1896, Daniel listed the seven still living with their birth dates.[6]

  1.  Emma Jane Woodward, born 28 September 1854.
  2.   Frank Daniel Woodward, born 12 May 1868.
  3.   Annie Laura Woodward, born 2 June 1865.
  4.   Wellington Russell Woodward, born 14 December 1866.
  5.   Grace Gertrude Woodward, born 12 august 1869.
  6.   Agnes Mabel Woodward, born 2 May 1874.
  7.   Florence (Flossie) Maud Woodward, born 28 June 1877, and died 21 December 1893.[7]
  8.   Oscar Herman Woodward, born 18 January 1880.

Prior to the Civil War, Daniel was occupied as a stonecutter or marble worker,[8] a trade he learned from his father Daniel S. Woodward

Family papers contain several obituaries from unidentified newspaper clippings. I’m including images of an obit of Flossie and one for Daniel R. who died 6 January 1910.

Obit_Florence

 Obituary of Daniel R. Woodward

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

 



[1] Union Pension File of Daniel R. Woodward, File Number: #WC-711-973, Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs (RG 15); National Archives, Washington, D.C. Hereinafter stated as Union Pension file of Daniel R. Woodward.

[2] Union Pension file of Daniel R. Woodward.

[3] Salisbury Town Records, 1749–1845, page 278, Town Clerk’s Office, Salisbury, New Hampshire; Family History Library microfilm #0,015,305.

[4] L.T. Townsend, History of the Sixteenth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers (Washington, D.C.: Henry L Johnson and Luther T. Townsend, 1897).

[5] Woodbury-Davis marriage, Massachusetts, Marriages, 1841-1915 index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N4M5-PPT : accessed 10 July 2012); and Massachusetts, marriage records database viewed at NewEnglandAncestors.com

[6] Union Pension file of Daniel R. Woodward.

[7] Obituary of Florence Woodward, The Journal Transcript, Franklin, New Hampshire, 29 December 1893.

[8] 1850 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Boscawen, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 258B, dwelling 110, family 112, line 11; National Archives microfilm M432, reel 436; and 1860 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Franklin, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 20, dwelling 729, family 728, line 27; National Archives microfilm M653, reel 677.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=628

Jan 14

52 Ancestors: #3 Oscar H Woodward

Oscar and Sara (Waddell) Woodward

Oscar and Sara (Waddell) Woodward

“I watch my vegetables very carefully, I take a can off the shelf and look at them every day,” was one of my paternal grandfather’s favorite sayings. The truth of the matter was that he had a great dislike for many vegetables, but my mother frequently reminded him that he needed to eat them daily.

Grandfather’s passion was writing stories. He wrote them one after another and submitted them to magazines in hopes of getting one in print. I don’t think that every happened. I recall his dismay whenever he received one of those polite letters indicating that the story was not a good fit for the magazine. He also enjoyed singing in the church choir and was particular proud during the two years that my father and I participate in the choir as well at the Congregational Church in Walpole, New Hampshire.

O.H. Woodward was born 18 January 1880 in Franklin, New Hampshire, son of Daniel Russell and Laura (Davis) Woodward.  He married Sara Waddell on the 28th of September 1907, in Belmont, Massachusetts.[1] The ceremony was conducted by Charles U. Day a minister in Watertown. The marriage register indicates that he was working as a needle maker in Franklin, N.H., and she as a nurse.

1940 Reunion #1Oscar and Sara had four children all born in Franklin, Merrimack County, New Hampshire

  1. Virginia Woodward, born 15 October 1908 and died 7 March 2008 at York Harbor, Maine.[2] She married George Mason Smith.
  2. Richard M. Woodward, born 26 May 1910 and died 13 January 2007. He married Bernice Iris Ford.
  3. Douglas Russell Woodward, born 4 October 1911 and died 8 March 1970 at Rye, New Hampshire. He married 1st Geraldine Hayward and 2nd Mrs. Beverly Powell.[3]
  4. Oscar H. Woodward, Jr., born 1 January 1915, and died 4 June 1965.

My paternal grandparents also raised Jean Collins who was listed in their home in the 1930 census as five years old until her graduation from high school marriage in the 1940s.[4]

Grandfather took part in two selective service acts, but in each case dodged military service because he was too old.

On the 25th of April 1942 he registered with the World War II Selective Service at Local Board No. 8 in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, in what is now commonly called the “Old Man’s Draft. At that time he was a sixty-two year old working in the engineering department of the Boston and Maine Railroad in Concord.

When he registered with the World War I Selective Service on the 12th of September 1918, he was thirty-eight and working as an agent for the B&M Railroad at North Station in Boston.[5]

Following his retirement from the Boston & Maine, grandfather received a pension from the Railroad Retirement Board. His file[6] contains over one hundred pages. The file is considerable thicker than most of the files—didn’t take long to discover the reason. Whe he retired, my grandparents were residing in a studio apartment at 11 Green Street, Concord, New Hampshire. I barely remember it, but I remember thinking it was strange. One room with a tiny kitchen county with tiny stove and sink behind roll-away doors and a Murphy bed for sleeping. Maybe they were ready to head for more open spaces. Retirement meant traveling from the home of one relative to another (I believe they gave up their little studio apartment soon after retirement)…  back to the packet with the files of the Railroad Retirement Board. I’d guess that ninety-five percent of the pages consisted of letters from my grandfather to the retirement office, telling them a new address they needed to use to mail check or complaining that the check had not arrived even though he’d “given them plenty of notice.” None-the-less the file provides a detail of their visits a few months hear with that child, a few months there with a niece or nephew. It will take me a while to get the chronology together, but I’m excited to have images of this wonderful file!

By the 1950s, Oscar and Sara had given up their nomad life style and moved in with their daughter and son-in-law in West Hartford, Connecticut. Aunt Virginia and Uncle George lived in a tiny four room flat on Farmington Avenue. The apartment had a small kitchen, one bedroom, a bath, and a living room and dining room that were separated by a large arch. A daybed at one end of the dinning room served as the sleeping arrangements for my grandparents. Grandmother died in Hartford in 1955 and from that time on my grandfather divided his year into segments when he lived with my aunt and uncle in the small flat and Walpole, N.H. where my family lived. While in Walpole, grandfather sometimes rented a small apartment.

3 generations of Woodwards sang in the choir, 1959

3 generations of Woodwards sang in the choir, 1959

Oscar H. Woodward, Sr., passed away at the Rockingham Hospital in Bellows Falls, Vermont, 25 August 1962.[7]



[1] Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841–1910. (From original records held by the Massachusetts Archives. Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2004.)

[2] Obituary of Virginia W. Smith, Concord Monitor, Concord, New Hampshire, 14 March 2008.

[3]  Obituary of Lt. Col. Douglas Woodward, U.S. Army (Ret.), Manchester Union Leader, Manchester, New Hampshire, 17 January 2007.

[4] 1930 U.S. Census, Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Enumeration District 8-11, sheet 2A; dwelling  27, family 36; National Archives microfilm T626, reel 1304; and 1940 U.S. Census, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Enumeration District 7-57, sheet 3A,  household 43; National Archives microfilm T627, reel 2294.

[5] World War I Draft Registration of Oscar Herman Woodward, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Selective Service Records, Record Group 163, National Archives-Southeast Region, East Point, Georgia.

[6] Railroad pension of Oscar H. Woodward, Sr., Claim #A249658; Railroad Retirement Board, Record Group 184; National Archives at Atlanta.

[7] Certificate of Death of Oscar H. Woodward, Sr., Rockingham Town Clerk’s Office, Rockingham, Vermont.

© 2014. Linda Woodward Geiger, CG, CGL. All Rights Reserved.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=619

Jul 06

Your Story – Career

Scrapper’s Guide theme for the month of July is Career. I’ve completed two pages (teacher & genealogist), but have not yet completed the roles that were most important to me (#1 mother & #2 wife). I’ll be completing those pages later this month. But for now….

 

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=510

Jun 29

Remembering Walpole High School

Three more scrapbook pages illustrating some of our high school activities. Can imagine growing up in a nicer community than Walpole, New Hampshire.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=504

May 30

Family Scrapbook Pages

This is the fifth challenge of “Your Story. Brilliant!” offered as a class by Linda Sattgast of ScrappersGuide.com. For this challenge I used paper & elements from Ever After kit by Krystal Hartley (Copyright 2010) and Scrappers Guide. The photographs are from my family collection.

The focus theme was “Early Childhood through Grade School.” Again the pages are not just about me, but about my twin (we were tighter than two peas in a pod). As usually, as the the month neared its end, I completed the task.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=493

Apr 20

Family Scrapbook Pages

This is the fourth challenge of “Your Story. Brilliant!” offered as a class by Linda Sattgast of ScrappersGuide.com.

This month the focus is on “Birth and Early Years.” As I have a twin brother it would be impossible to isolate my story since we were rarely apart during our youth. Peter is 5 minutes older than I and I remind him every year of how pleased I am that I’m not the oldest of four siblings—he is! Our younger brother is about 6 years young and the baby of the family is about 10 years younger than we are.

 

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=475

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