Category Archive: Loudon

Jun 07

52 Ancestors: #21 The House in Loudon Village

While growing up, my twin brother and I spent a lot of time at the home of our grandmother Perkins in Loudon Village. We never knew our grandfather Perkins—he died before we were born. I can attest to the fact that he was an active real estate dealer as I have many of his original deeds and because Nana Perkins told me that he would purchase a house, she’d turn it into a home, he’d sell the home, and the cycle would begin all over again. When I asked her why he’d not sold the present house that she’d lived in for years, she told me that when he put the “For Sale” sign in the front yard, she yanked the sign out of the ground. He got the message.

The acreage on which the house sat was above the roadbed by several feet. In addition to the house there was a large garage with attached shed and a separate hen house (rarely occupied). The shingled house stood on the island formed by the semi-circular dirt drive around the house.

The house had seven rooms (four down and three up) with an attached shed area that contained an additional three rooms of non-living space. The back door of the house opened into the first shed area where the laundry apparatus and icebox were located. My first memories are of the galvanized tubs and washboards that were used to do the family laundry. A big electric washtub with agitator and attached wringer comprised of two wooden rollers later replaced these laundry tools. Mr. Rogers and his team hauling huge blocks of ice stopped twice a week to refurbish the ice in the icebox. A truck with wooden bed later replaced the team of horses and the wagon. The other parts of the attached shed where used for storage.

The best food ever was cooked on the wood stove in the kitchen—when I close my eyes I can see and almost smell the aroma from those beautiful fruit pies. Other furnishings in the kitchen were a corner cupboard, a Hoosier cabinet, a large table with lots of chairs and a rocking chair. And, oh yes, there was a contraption that was connected to the stove that served as a water heater. Water from this would be used to wash the dishes in the long soap sink in the pantry located between the kitchen and the dinning room.

One of the two front rooms was used as a sitting room and the second as an office. The latter contained a big desk with rickety old typewriter. Nana Perkins served as the elected town clerk for the town of Loudon for many years and this room served as the Town Clerk’s Office. Nana was, also, a local correspondent for the Concord Monitor, and the weekly newspapers published in Pittsfield and Laconia. It seemed like that old typewriter was continually clattering. 1952_LindaThis was also the room where Nana Perkins taught me to sew. I remember sitting at her old Singer treadle machine when I was about ten years old making my very first outfit—a pair of shorts and halter-top constructed from a blue calico print.

The house in the village will always bring me wonderful memories and happy smiles.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=751

Apr 04

1940 Census – Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire

1940 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Enumeration District 7-57, Sheet 3-A; downloaded from Archives.gov 3 April 2012.

The unincorporated area called Loudon Village was enumerated on 9 April 2012 by Wm. Joyce Medlock. My parents were listed with their respective parents. Their homes where on opposite sides of Main Street directly across from one another.

Family of Alice M. Perkins (Alice furnished the information)
Lines  18–20, household no. 42; Alice owned her home worth $3,000; in 1935 the family lived in the same house;
Household members (all born in New Hampshire): 1) Alice M. Perkins, head, age 54, widow, completed 4 years of high school; 2) Josephine E. Perkins, daughter, age 22, completed two years of college, and employed as an office attendant in a hospital; and 3) Alice M. Deprey, lodger, age 28, completed two years of college, and employed as a school teacher.
Family of Oscar H. Woodward (Sara Woodward furnished the information)
Lines 21–24, household no. 43; Oscar owned his home worth $3,000; in 1935 the family lived in Concord, Merrimack County, NH
Household members:1) Oscar H. Woodward, head; age 60, completed four years of high school, born in NH, and employed as a trackman for a steam railroad;  2) Sara M Woodward, wife, age 58, completed two years of high school, born in Nova Scotia; 3) Oscar H Woodward Jr, son, age 25, completed four hears of high school, born in NH, in 1935 he was in the U.S. Army, and employed as a truck driver; and 4) Jean M. Collins, lodger, age 15, completed 8 years of school, and born in NH.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.


Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=457

Nov 27

Seaver’s Saturday Night Challenge

The government structure of New England is unlike that of much of the United States. In that vain, I’ve taken a slight twist on Randy Seaver’s  “Saturday Night Fun Challenge” using Randy Majors’ website, http://randymajors.com/p/maps.html. My focus is on the town of Loudon, New Hampshire, rather than on Merrimack County within which Loudon, now lies.

Province of New Hampshire (now one of New England’s six states): On 18 September 1679, King Charles II made New Hampshire a royal colony separate from Massachusetts, but did not stipulate a western limit to its borders.[1]

New Hampshire Vermont Atlas of Historical County Boundaries*

Historical U.S. County Boundary Maps

1770 Effective Saturday, April 29, 1769, ROCKINGHAM created as one of five original counties

1773 Loudon in the province of New Hampshire
The first settlement was begun in 1761. Loudon, formerly a part of Canterbury, was incorporated on 28 January 1773,[2] and was within the jurisdiction of Rockingham County.

1780 Loudon, Rockingham County

1790 Loudon, Rockingham County

1800 Loudon, Rockingham County

1810 Loudon, Rockingham County

1820 Loudon, Rockingham County

1825 Effective 1 August 1823, Merrimack County was created from Hillsborough and Rockingham Counties.[3]

1830 Effective 24 December 1828, Merrimack County gained some area from Strafford when the town of Franklin was created from the towns of Andover, Northfield, Salisbury, and Sanbornton.

1830 Loudon, Merrimack County

1840 Loudon, Merrimack County

1850 Loudon, Merrimack County

1860 Loudon, Merrimack County

1870 Loudon, Merrimack County

1880 Loudon, Merrimack County

1890 Loudon, Merrimack County

1900 Loudon, Merrimack County

How do these boundaries affect my research?

Since vital records are under the jurisdiction of the town in New Hampshire, in addition to looking for records of births, marriage, and deaths for families know to have resided early in Loudon, I need to look at the records of Canterbury, since Loudon was formed from lands formerly in the town of Canterbury.

For probate and deed records for the families living in Loudon, prior to the formation of Merrimack County in December 1828, I need to look for the records in the county of Rockingham.


[1] T.J. Rand, coordinator of “Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire,” NHGenWeb page http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nhmerrim/Loudon/ viewed 26 November 2011.

[2] Marcia D. Melnyk, Genealogist’s Handbook for New England Research, 4th edition (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), 150.

[3] Randy Majors, “Historical U.S. County Boundary Maps, ”http://randymajors.com/p/maps.html, viewed 26 November 2011.

* John H. Long, editor, New Hampshire Vermont Atlas of Historical County Boundaries (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993).  [A project of the Dr. William M. Scholl Center for Family and Community History: The Newberry Library.]

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=368

Nov 04

Parents of Homer Lathe Perkins

Although we have no contemporary record to provide evidence that Emma A. Jenkins was the mother of Homer Lathe Perkins nor a marriage record for John Butters Perkins and Emma A. Jenkins, we have the following evidence of their marriage.

  • Tombstone of John Butters Perkins and Emma A., his wife[1]
  • 1880 U.S. Census indicates that Emily A. is the wife of John B Perkins.[2]
  • 1900 U.S. Census: indicates that Emma A. is the wife of John B. Perkins, that Emma had given birth to four children, three of whom were still living[3] [Louisa B. died 31 July 1885.[4] John B. and Emma A. Perkins had both been married for 32 years. There were three children in the household: Etta Belle, daughter, born November 1869; Charles B., son, born June 1872; and Homer L., son, born Jun 1876.
  • Marriage of Etta B. Perkins and George W. Rowell states that Etta Belle’s parents were John B. Perkins and Emma Jenkins.[5]
  • Birth of Charles B. Perkins, born 13 June 1872, filed 28 February 1928,[6] show parents as John B. Perkins and Emma A. Jenkins.
  • Birth of Louisa B. Perkins, born 6 July 1875, filed 28 February 1925,[7] show parents as John B. Perkins and Emma A. Jenkins

Although much of the evidence is not “close” to the time of the event, I do believe that we have a strong argument indicating that the parents of Homer Lathe Perkins, were John B. Perkins and Emma Jenkins.



[1] Triple headstone for John B. Perkins; Emma A., his wife; and Louise B. Perkins, Mount Hope Cemetery, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire (behind the 1st Congregational Church in Loudon Village) photographed by Linda Woodward Geiger, September 1991.

[2] 1880 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Enumeration District 184, sheet 4D, dwelling 40, family 42, line 34; National Archives micropublication T9, reel 766; viewed on Ancestry.com 3 November 2011.

[3] 1890 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 150, Enumeration District 169, sheet 7A, dwelling 163, family 163, line 18; National Archives micropublication T623, reel 949; viewed at the National Archives-Southeast Region, East Point, Georgia.

[4] Triple headstone for John B. Perkins; Emma A., his wife; and Louise B. Perkins, Mount Hope Cemetery, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire (behind the 1st Congregational Church in Loudon Village) photographed by Linda Woodward Geiger, September 1991.

[5] State of New Hampshire marriage record of Etta Belle Perkins & George Rowell; FamilySearch database “New Hampshire Marriage Records, 1637-1947, image 505; viewed 3 November 2011 [in FamilySearch.org, the indexed refers to George U. Powell and Ella P. Perkins].

[6] State of New Hampshire birth record of Charles B. Perkins; FamilySearch database “New Hampshire Birth Records, Early to 1900, image 2602; viewed 4 November 2011. It should be noted that this is a derivate document filed some fifty-two years after his birth.

[7] State of New Hampshire birth record of Louisa B. Perkins; FamilySearch database “New Hampshire Birth Records, Early to 1900, image 2602; viewed 4 November 2011.  It should be noted that this is a derivate document filed some fifty years after her birth.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=338

Mar 27

Sweets

During week #13 of 52 Weeks of Personal Genealogy & History, the topic is “Sweets.” What, you ask, does a Steeple clock have to do with sweets?

When my twin brother and I were toddlers, we lived in an apartment across from Craigen’s Store in Loudon Village, New Hampshire. At the time Dad was away most of the time serving as a Marine during World War II. I know now that money was very tight for the family and as I look back, I can understand it better. I remember Mom washing clothes using a galvenized tub and a scrub board, but I digress.

Our parents tried their best to make Dad’s furloughs memorable. One of their favorite activities was to stage bubble contests using bubble gum (a nice sweet flavor). To our delight every one in the family participated. There was much laughter … that is until it was time to clean up and the kerosene was called into action. Mom would tie my hair away from my face in hopes that I wouldn’t get gum in my hair, but I generally managed to do so anyway.

Any left over gum was stored in the back of the steeple clock that was kept on a shelf behind the living room couch. I recall wanting a piece so very badly (even though I was not supposed to have it) that I set out to invade the storeage place. The clock came crashing down on my head and several parts broke off. Needless to say my Mom was most unhappy and I received the punishment I certainly diserved.

Copyright. Linda Woodward Geiget. All rights reserved.
linda@lindageiger.com

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=167

Mar 09

Wordless Wednesday: Emma Jenkins

 

Emma Jenkins (1847-1906)

 

 

 

Emma Jenkins, born 9 November 1847 & died 6 March 1906 [Annual Report of the Financial Affairs of the Town of Loudon (Loudon, New Hampshire: The Town, 1907].
The identification on the reverse side of the photograph is in the hand of Alice M. (Brown) Perkins.

Emma was the wife of John Butters Perkins…They were my great grandparents.

 

(c) 2011 Linda Woodward Geiger, All Rights Reserved.
Linda@LindaGeiger.com

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=128

Mar 08

Tombstone Tuesday: Perkins & Jenkins

Tombston of John Butters Perkins; his wife, Emma Jenkins; and their daughter, Louise B.,

These tombstone are located in the Moore Cemetery behind the Congregational Church in Loudon Village, New Hampshire.

Perkins
John B. Perkins
Jan. 25, 1844 – May 1, 1918
Emma A. his wife
Nov. 3, 1847 – Mar. 6, 1906
Louise B. Perkins
July 6, 1875-July 31, 1885

Tombstone of William & Joanna B. Jenkins, and three of their children

William and Joanna Jenkins were the parents of Louise B. Jenkins.

Jenkins
William Jenkins, June  8, 1811 – Mar. 18, 1896
Joanna B. His Wife
Apr. 18, 1811 – Nov. 25, 1888
Children
Mary H., Jan. 10, 1833 – Dec. 30, 1889
Louise J. Jan. 10, 1836 – Feb 9, 1900
Etta G. Apr. 1, 1850 – Mar. 19, 1854.

(c) 2011 Linda Woodward Geiger, All Rights Reserved.
Linda@LindaGeiger.com

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=133