Category Archive: Merrimack Co., New Hampshire

Apr 14

52 Ancestors: #15 Stephen Perkins of Chichester

Stephen Perkins and his wife, Betsey Lane, were my second great grandparents.

Stephen Perkins was born on 20 April 1806 in Chichester, Rockingham County,[1] New Hampshire.[2]He died on 20 September 1897 at the age of 91 in Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[3]

Stephen Perkins II and Betsey Lane were married on 25 November 1832.[4] Betsey Lane, daughter of Jeremiah Lane and Eunice Tilton, was born on 23 July 1805 in Chichester, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.[5] She died on 22 September 1890 at the age of 85 in Chichester.[6]

Stephen and Betsey were buried in Chichester.[7]

Stephen Perkins and Betsey Lane had the following children, all born in Chichester:

  1. Hannah H. Perkins was born on 19 May 1835 and died on 25 November.[8]
  2. Stephen Prentiss Perkins, born 6 March 1837;[9] married Lavina Jane Case, 22 November 1866; and died 16 May 1903, Chichester.[10]
  3. Sarah Eunice Perkins, born 6 March 1840;[11] married Rinaldo Bracket Foster, 15 July 1860, Chichester; and died 20 October 1899, in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  4. Jeremiah Lane Perkins, born 26 March 1842;[12] married Jennie Maria Osgood, 29 March 1874, in Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire; and died 21 November 1899, in Loudon.[13]
  5. John Butters Perkins, born 25 January 1844;[14] married Emma Adeline Jenkins; and died 7 May 1918, in Loudon[15]. [See blog post http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=707]
  6. Charles B. Perkins was born on 13 August 1846;[16] and died on 12 February 1874 at the age of 27 in Chichester[17].
  7. Ann M. Perkins, born 3 November 1849; married Charles Eddy Payne, 18 September 1876; and died 4 January 1929, in Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[18]

Stephen, son of Stephen, is typically called Stephen Jr. and resided near his father in Chichester.

Census Records

Stephen and his family were enumerated in Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire from 1830 through 1880.

1830.  Stephen (listed as 20 to 30), living alone, resided next door to his father, Stephen Perkins.[19] This population schedule did not offer reference to occupation.

1840.  Stephen and his family were residing next door to his father, Stephen Perkins. Of the six people (1 male under 5, 1 male 5 to 10, 2 males 30 to 40, 1 female under 5, and 1 female 30 to 40) in his household, three were engaged in Agriculture.[20]

23 October 1850.[21] Stephen Perkins, Household (all born in New Hampshire):

Stephen Perkins, age 44, farmer, real estate valued at $200
Betsey Perkins, age 44
Stephen P. Perkins, age 13
Sarah E. Perkins, age 10
Jeremiah L. Perkins, age 8
John B. Perkins, age 6
Charles L. Perkins, age 4
Ann M. Perkins, age 3/4

9 June 1860.[22] Stephen Perkins Household (all born in New Hampshire):

Stephen Perkins, age 54, farmer, real estate valued at $1,600 and personal property valued at $15,000
Betsy, age 54
Stephen P., age 23, farmer
Sarah, age 20
Jeremiah, age 18, student
John B., age 16
Chas. F., age 14
Ann, age 10

26 June 1870.[23]  Stephen Perkins Household (all born in New Hampshire):

Stephen Perkins, age 64, farmer, real property valued at $6,000 and personal property valued at $12,000
Betsey, age 64, keeping house
Jeremiah, age 28, farm laborer
Charles F, age 23, farm laborer
Ann M., age 20,

24 June 1880.[24] Stephen Perkins Household (all born in New Hampshire)

Stephen Perkins, age 74, farmer
Betsy, age 74, wife, keeping house
Prentice [Stephen Prentiss] Perkins, age 42, son, farmer
Lavina, 36, daughter-in-law, age 36, keeping house
Alice M., grand daughter, age 10, at school
Stephen C. grandson, age 7, at school
William R Adams, age 75, servant, farm laborer

Property Records

The 1850, 1860, and 1870 federal census records Stephen with real property. A consequent incomplete search of deed records in Merrimack County provides some clues. However, it is necessary for the deed work (search and analysis) to continue.

To date the following documents have been located:

Probate Records

Stephen affixed his signature to his last will and testament on 29 Jun 1887 in Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[29] Stephen’s will described the following bequeaths:

  • “,,, unto my daughter Ann M. Paine, the sum of five dollars”
  • “… unto my daughter Sarah E. Foster, the sum of five dollars”
  • “… unto my son John B. Perkins of Loudon… the sum of one dollar”
  • “… unto my son Jeremiah L. Perkins the interest and income of fifteen shares of the National State Capital Bank of Concord New Hampshire for and during the time of his natural life from and immediately after the decease of said Jeremiah L. Perkins I give and bequeath unto my grandchildren Alice M. Perkins, Stephen C. Perkins and Ralph S. Perkins children of my son Stephen P. Perkins the aforesaid fifteen share of Bank stock to be divided equally among them.”
  • “… unto my aforesaid son Jeremiah L. Perkins all the demands and promissory notes which I hold against my son John B. Perkins and all debts due me from said John B. Perkins”
  • “… unto my son Stephen P. Perkins his heirs and assigns forever all the residue of my estate both real and personal estate wherever found or however situated”

Stephen appointed Thomas H. Thorndike, Esq. of Pittsfield to be his sole executor. David T. Brown, Stephen R. Watson, and F.H. Thorndike were witnesses to this will, dated 29 June 1887.

Stephen’s will was presented for probate 4 September 1897 in Merrimack County Court of Probate, Concord, New Hampshire.

Future Research

  • Continue deed research, seeking and analyzing, in Merrimack County, New Hampshire with Stephen Perkins as grantor and grantee.
  • Perform a complete search of probate records for Stephen Perkins in Merrimack County, New Hampshire.

 

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.



[1] Chichester became part of Merrimack County when that county was formed out of Rockingham and Hillsborough Counties in 1823 [John H. Long, Editor, New Hampshire, Vermont, Atlas of Historical County Boundaries (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993), 47].

[2] William Haslet Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, New Hampshire, 17421927 (Bowie, Maryland: Heritage Books, 2000), 31; hereinafter cited as Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester.

[3] Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, 127.

[4] Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, 65.

[5] Thomas Allen Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, and His Descendants, 15831936 (Haverhill, Massachusetts: Record Publishing Company, 1947), 91; hereinafter cited as Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine.

[6] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 91.

[7] Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, 127.

[8] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 91.

[9] Town Records of Chichester, New Hampshire, Volume V (Chichester, New Hampshire: The Town), 116; Family History Library microfilm 15,099; hereinafter cited as Town Records of Chichester.

[10] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 91.

[11] Town Records of Chichester, 116.

[12] Town Records of Chichester, 116.

[13] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 180.

[14] Town Records of Chichester, 116.

[15] Deaths Registered in the Town of Loudon for the Year Ending December 31, 1906, Annual Report of the Town of Loudon, 1907 (Concord, New Hampshire: The Town of Loudon, 1907).

[16] Town Records of Chichester, 116.

[17] Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, 127. In this derivate publication, he was called Charles F. Perkins.

[18] Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, 91.

[19] 1830 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 180, line 13; National Archives microfilm M19, reel 76.

[20] 1840 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 48, line 23; National Archives microfilm M704, reel 240.

[21] 1850 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 40, dwelling 8, family 11; National Archives microfilm M432, reel 436.

[22] 1860 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 22, dwelling 188, family 188, lines 24–31; National Archives microfilm M653, reel 677.

[23] 1870 U.S. Census, Free Population Schedule, Chichester, New Hampshire, page 88, dwelling 7, family 8, lines 27–31; National Archives microfilm M593, reel 845 viewed on Ancestry.com, 13 April 2014.

[24] 1880 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 83B,  Enumeration District 165, dwelling 106, family 118, lines 21-26; National Archives microfilm T9, reel 765.

[25] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 22: 512; Family History Library microfilm #16,121.

[26] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 67: 295; Family History Library microfilm #16,144.

[27] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 53: 519; Family History Library microfilm #16,137.

[28] Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Deed Book 53: 519; Family History Library microfilm #16,137.

[29] Will of Stephen Perkins, New Hampshire, Merrimack County, Probate Records, 1880–1900, Volume 88: 334–335; Family History Library microfilm #1,571,928.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=713

Apr 12

52 Ancestors: #14 John Butters Perkins

This 52 week, 52 Ancestors challenge is proving to be very interesting. As I analysis the research I’ve conducted, it is apparent that I should have put my blinders on—why in the world have I no record of possible estate or property records of John Butters Perkins? John would have been about seventeen years old at the beginning of the Civil War. Why have I not searched for possible Union service for him? All I have are the boring vital statistics and census records for John and his family.

John Butters Perkins, son of Stephen Perkins and Betsey Lane, was born on 25 January 1844 in Chichester, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[1] He died of a cerebral hemorrhage on 7 May 1918 at the age of 74 in Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[2]

John Butters Perkins married Emma Adeline Jenkins,[3] about 1868. Emma Adeline, daughter of William Jenkins and Joanne B. Foss, was born on 9 Nov 1847 in Barnstead, Belknap County, New Hampshire. She died on 6 Mar 1906 at the age of 58 in Loudon.[4]

Death of John B. Perkins

John B. and Emma A. were buried with their daughter Louise in Mount Hope Cemetery, Loudon Village, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.[5]

tombstone_PerkinsJohnB-Emma

John and his family were enumerated on the federal decennial census records on 16 June 1870,[6] 3 June 1880,[7] and on 21 June 1900.[8] John was enumerated in the home of his son, Homer L. Perkins on 9 May 1910, in Loudon.[9]

John Butters Perkins and Emma Adeline Jenkins had the following children:

  1. Etta Belle Perkins, born 7 November 1869,[10] Manchester, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire; married George Wilmer Rowell, 29 August 1903, Boscawen, Merrimack County, New Hampshire;[11] died 10 Oct 1950 and buried with her husband in Moore Cemetery, in Loudon.[12]
  2. Charles Bauman Perkins, born 13 June 1873, Loudon; married Grace Clough, 27 February 1904, Pittsfield, Merrimack County.[13]
  3. Louise Betsy Perkins was born on 6 July 1875 in Loudon. [14] She died on 31 July 1885 at the age of 10 in Loudon and was buried in Mount Hope Cemetery.[15]
  4. Homer Lathe Perkins, born 16 Jun 1879, Loudon; married Alice Margaret Brown, 8 April 1908, Chester, Rockingham County, New Hampshire; and died 22 August1939, Loudon. [See previous blog entry http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=701.]

Future Research

  • Search for deeds (grantee and grantor) in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, for John Butters Perkins.
  • Search for possible probate records for John B. Perkins in Merrimack County from 1910 and possibly forward for several years.
  • Search for possible service in the Union during the Civil War Period for John Butters Perkins.
© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.


[1] Tombstone of John B. Perkins; Emma A, his wife, and Louise B. Perkins, Mount Hope Cemetery, located in Loudon Village, behind the Congregation Church, viewed and photographed by the author, 28 September 1991 (hereinafter cited as Tombstone of John B. Perkins, et al); and William Haslet Jones, Vital Statistics of Chichester, New Hampshire, 1742–1927 (Bowie Maryland: Heritage Books, Inc., 2000), 31.

[2] “New Hampshire, Death Records, 1654-1947,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11623-1872-63?cc=1601211 : accessed 11 Apr 2014), 004243185 > image 1913 of 2917; citing Bureau Vital Records and Health Statistics, Concord; Tombstone of John B. Perkins, et al; and Deaths Registered in the Town of Loudon for the Year Ending December 31, 1906, Annual Report of the Town of Loudon, 1919 (Concord, New Hampshire: The Town of Loudon, 1920).

[3] Thomas Allen Perkins, Jacob Perkins of Wells, Maine, and His Descendants, 1583-1936 (Haverhill, Massachusetts: Record Publishing company, 1947), 181.

[4] Deaths Registered in the Town of Loudon for the Year Ending December 31, 1906, Annual Report of the Town of Loudon, 1907 (Concord, New Hampshire: The Town of Loudon, 1907).

[5] Tombstone of John B. Perkins, et al.

[6] 1870 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 384B, dwelling 195, family 177 lines 6–8; National Archives microfilm M593, reel 846.

[7] 1880 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 364D, Enumeration District 184, dwelling 40, family 42, lines 33–38; National Archives microfilm T9, reel 766.

[8] 1900 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, page 150, Enumeration District 169, sheet 7, dwelling 163, family 163, lines 17–21; National Archives microfilm T623, reel 949.

[9] 1910 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Enumeration District 220, sheet 9A, dwelling 164, family 166, lines 1–4; National Archives microfilm T624, reel 865.

[10] Tombstone of George W. Rowell and Etta B. Perkins, his wife, Moore Cemetery, located in Loudon Village, behind the Congregation Church adjacent to Mount Hope Cemetery, viewed and photographed by the author, 28 September 1991 (hereinafter cited as Tombstone of George and Etta B. Perkins Rowell).

[11] “New Hampshire, Marriage Records, 1637-1947,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FL85-HFN : accessed 11 Apr 2014), Emma A. Jenkins in entry for Charles B. Perkins and Grace A. Clough, 27 Feb 1904; citing Pittsfield, , New Hampshire, Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics, Concord; FHL microfilm 2069876.

[12] Tombstone of George W. Rowell and Etta B. Perkins, his wife, Moore Cemetery, located in Loudon Village, behind the Congregation Church adjacent to Mount Hope Cemetery, viewed and photographed by the author, 28 September 1991 (hereinafter cited as Tombstone of George and Etta B. Perkins Rowell).

[13] “New Hampshire, Marriage Records, 1637-1947,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FL85-HFN : accessed 11 Apr 2014), Emma A. Jenkins in entry for Charles B. Perkins and Grace A. Clough, 27 Feb 1904; citing Pittsfield, , New Hampshire, Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics, Concord; FHL microfilm 2069876.

[14] Tombstone of John B. Perkins, et al.

[15] Tombstone of John B. Perkins, et al.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=707

Mar 03

52 Ancestors: #9 – Alfred H. Brown

Alfred H. Brown

I never knew my great grandfather, Alfred H. Brown, he died in 1920 and his daughter, my maternal grandmother, rarely spoke of him. I always think of my great grandfather as a store keeper, but he had many facets to his life. Indeed he did own and run a general store in Canterbury, New Hampshire (it burned down about 1927 with several other structures, but was eventually rebuilt as a general store that was still in operations when I last visited the area in 1991).

BooksFromAHB_smI do know that my great grandfather was interested in his pedigree. Several of his books on county history have been passed on to me, including the History of Canterbury, New Hampshire, [1] The History of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, 1735–1914,[2] and Genealogies of the Old Families of Concord, Mass. And Their Descendants.[3] Thankfully, these histories have provided wonderful clues to what might have been a difficult family to search.

Alfred H. Brown was born in New Ipswich, New Hampshire, 14 July 1838, son of Hermon and Sophronia (Prescott) Brown.[4] He died 4 October 1921 as reference in the diary of his daughter, Alice M. Perkins by the following entries.

3 Oct 1921:  “Papa [Alfred H. Brown] looks very sick and I feel he will not last long.”

4 Oct 1921:  “Papa passed away about noon. “

Around 1861, Alfred and his brother, Joseph moved from New Ipswich to Canterbury where they formed a partnership and opened a general store. In 1868, Alfred bought his brother out and continued to run the general store until his death in 1921.[5]

Margaret Elizabeth Gale married Alfred H. Brown in Canterbury on 20 January 1872.[6] She was the daughter of Eliphalet and Mary Jane (Merrill) Gale.

The couple had four children all born and raised in Canterbury:

  1. Josephine Maud Brown, born 1 January 1873;[7] and died 24 November 1958.[8] Josephine, who never married, served as a librarian at the New Hampshire State Library for many years.
  2. Fred Hermon Brown, born 19 March, 1874,[9] and died 21 July 1947.[10] He married…
  3. Mary Prescott Brown, born 2 May 1877.[11] She married Richard A. Cody…
  4. Alice Margaret Brown, born 20 Feb 1886,[12] and died 4 June 1983.[13] She married Homer Lathe Perkins of Loudon, 8 April 1908 in Chester, New Hampshire.

Alfred and Margaret raised their family in a four-over-four colonial structure with an attached el and barn. His daughter, Alice (my grandmother) was born in the front right bedroom on the second floor (see image of their home, called The Maples, in my blog about Alice Margaret Brown).

Alfred and Margaret are buried in Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord, New Hampshire.

According to the History of the Town of Canterbury: [14]

No turmoil ever disturbed Mr. Brown and his record was never questioned, no matter how bitter the partisan strife of the day.  In the discharge of his duties he has ever been courteous, obliging and helpful; and as a public official, he has enjoyed the confidence of all parties. During the long winter evenings the store was the place where politics and current events were discussed.  No lyceum ever afforded more earnest debates and very few more entertainment.  The arguments of political speakers and the facts presented by public lecturers were here analyzed and dissected.  These gatherings night after night with their exchange of views contributed to make a Canterbury audience most critical, and he who came to address them was fortunate if his statements were not challenged by one of more of his hearers.  If these store discussions took an acrimonious turn, Mr. Brown had the happy faculty of changing the current of thought of his visitors.

 In 1862, be became postmaster of Canterbury and held that position for most of the years he had the store. Mr. Brown also served the community for many years as the town clerk of Canterbury.[15]

An article in The Granite Monthly, provided the following account of Alfred H. Brown:[16]

A.H. Brown is the A.T. Stewart of the town [Canterbury, N.H.].  For twenty years last past he has ministered to the corporal wants of Canterbury, dealing out the sweets and sours, attending to the clerkly business of the town, and devoting considerable attention to the improvement of an assorted breed of hogs.  He is not to the manor born, although his better half is [Margaret Gale]. His mercantile operations are not confined to the limited sphere of Canterbury. His energies have sought an outlet at the Weirs, where a branch store will be run at full blast the coming season.

The place at the Weirs reference in The Granite Monthly article immediately was a summer hotel called the “Aquedoktan House”, located 80 rods south of the train depot, where rooms could be found for $1.50 per day or $7 and $8 per Week.  Breakfast was served for 35¢, supper for 35¢, and dinner for 50¢.  Mr. Dennett was an apparent joint partner in this venture.  I do not know how many seasons the pair ran this hotel before it was burned to the ground.

Aquedoktan House

Aquedoktan House

Great grandfather also had an interest in pigs and establishing a better product. I’ve always enjoyed the following image of Alfred H. Brown and his prize winning hog.
Alfred H. Brown and his hog with Clarence S. GaleThe following image of Alfred and his wife, Margaret, was taken at the home of their daughter Mary Prescott (Brown) Cody in Newton Highlands, Massachusetts.
Alfred&Margaret© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.


[1] James Otis Lyford, History of the Town of Canterbury, New Hampshire, 1727-1912, 2 volumes (Concord, New Hampshire: The Rumford Press, 1912), hereinafter cited as History of the Town of Canterbury.

[2] Charles Henry Chandler, The History of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, 1735–1914 (Fitchburg, Massachusetts: Sentinel Printing Company, 1914), hereinafter cited as History of New Ipswich.

[3] Charles Edward Potter, editor, Genealogies of the Old Families of Concord, Mass. And Their Descendants in Part to the Present Generation, volume 1 (Boston: Alfred Mudge & Son, Printers, 1887).

[4]  History of the Town of Canterbury II: 46; and History of New Ipswich, 276.

[5] History of the Town of Canterbury I: 203.

[6] Brown-Gale Marriage Record, New Hampshire Bureau of Vital Records, Hazen Road, Concord, New Hampshire; History of the Town of Canterbury II: 46; and History of New Ipswich, 276

[7] History of the Town of Canterbury II: 46.

[8] Grave Marker of Josephine M. Brown, Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord, New Hampshire, viewed August 1993

[9] History of the Town of Canterbury II: 46.

[10] Grave Marker of Fred H. Brown, Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord, New Hampshire, viewed August 1993.

[11] History of the Town of Canterbury II: 47.

[12] History of the Town of Canterbury II: 47.

[13] Funeral Memorial Card for Alice M. Perkins, Arrangements by Foley Funeral Home, Keene, N.H. in possession of the author who also attended the funeral at the United Church of Christ in Keene, New Hampshire, 8 June, 1983.

[14] History of the Town of Canterbury I: 267.

[15] Alfred’s daughter, Alice M. (Brown) Perkins served for many years as the town clerk of Loudon, New Hampshire, and his granddaughter, Josephine (Perkins) Woodward served a term or two as the town clerk of Walpole, New Hampshire.

[16] The Granite Monthly, a New Hampshire Magazine, June, 1881, page 388.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=675

Jul 05

Military Service of Lewis M. Davis

Searching for possible military service of my great uncle, Lewis M. Davis was not straightforward. My first go to for Civil War service is the National Park Service database of Soldiers and Sailors [http://www.nps.gov/civilwar/soldiers-and-sailors-database.htm]. I’ve not used the site for quite a while and was greeted by a complete makeover since my last visit. I searched soldiers for “Lewis M. Davis” and “New Hampshire” with no result. Broadening the search I sought “Lewis Davis” and “New Hampshire with the following result:

Soldiers_DavisLewis

NPS “Soldiers & Sailors” database

Who is this Lewis F. Davis serving in the 16th NH (middle entry). Could this entry have been miss-read by someone who interpreted the letter “M” as “F”?

Since I’m not physically located near a repository with the microfilm of New Hampshire service records, I needed to try another Online search tool. I turned to Ancestry.com. Ah Ha! Lewis M. Davis was located in the database “U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles, 1861-1865. Like his brother-in-law, he had enlisted in Company E, New Hampshire 16th Infantry Regiment [Ancestry's source: Register of Soldiers and Sailors of New Hampshire].

 

 

 

DavisLewisM_service

Ancestry – “U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles

I found it interesting that this abstract indicates that Lewis M. was mustered out on the 20th of August 1863 at Concord, NH and died one day later.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=574

Jul 02

Davis Burials in Sawyer Cemetery, Merrimack County, NH

In September 1991, I was fortunate to have a road-trip with my uncle, Douglas Russell Woodward, while visiting in New Hampshire. Uncle Doug, 2nd child of Oscar H. Woodward and Sara Waddell, had spent much of his youth in West Franklin before his family removed to East Concord. We visited West Franklin where he pointed out the house his father rented on South Main Street while he was a young boy. He also showed me the house where he recalled his great grandmother Nancy (neé Glines) Davis resided and the cemetery, Sawyer Cemetery, where she was buried with her husband and at least two of her children. Alas, I had no GPS unit at the time, nor did I take careful note of the location of the two homes. What was I thinking?

A DeLorme map of New Hampshire, published in 1984, illustrates the location of Sawyer Cemetery.

1984 map showing location of Sawyer Cemetery.

Green Arrow Points to Sawyer Cemetery near the head of Webster Lake

Apparently, at one time the road on which the Davis family resided (in Andover just over the Franklin line) continued on past Sawyer Cemetery and on to the head of Webster Lake. That road had long since been impassable in 1991.

Davis Tombstones in Sawyer Cemetery

Davis Tombstones in Sawyer Cemetery

Lewis Davis

Lewis Davis

 

Nancy Davis

Nancy Davis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lewis M. Davis

Lewis M. Davis

Catherine Davis

Catherine Davis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On that trip Uncle Doug also showed me the cemetery in Franklin where his paternal grandparents were buried the needle factory building were several of his uncles and great uncles worked. The needle factory will be discussed at a later date.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=587

Jul 01

From NH to Minnesota in a Conestoga Wagon?

 

Family Tradition…. Several family stories have been proven to be way off the mark and only apparent wishful thinking on the part of my grandfather and uncle. Consequently when my uncle told me that his great grandmother (Nancy Glines Davis) had gone to Minnesota in a Conestoga wagon, but had returned since they didn’t like living there, I was somewhat skeptical.

Many years later the memory and interest in the story was renewed when I found the will of Lewis M. Davis, written on10 November 1862 in Franklin, New Hampshire and probated in September 1963.[1] In his will, written while a soldier in service of the United States, “First One hundred and sixty acres of land situated in the town of Sauk Center Sterans County in the State of Minnesota….to Cora Judkins for her sole comfort and benefit she to come in possession at the age of eighteen the daughter of Horace and Esabeth Judkins…”

probate-#6128_01

probate-#6128_02

probate-#6128_03

Lewis M. Davis, son of Lewis and Nancy (Glines) Davis,[2]  died  21 August 1863, at the age of 31.

I need to determine where and how he died. I suspect while he was serving with the Union forces.

Lewis is not a direct ancestor. His sister, Laura Davis, wife of Daniel R. Woodward, was my great grandmother. Daniel R. Woodward served in the Company E, 16th New Hampshire Volunteer Regiment.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

———————

[1] Will of Lewis M. Davis, Probate Case #6128, Merrimack County, New Hampshire; Probate Clerk’s Office, Concord, New Hampshire.

[2] Tombstone of Lewis M. Davis, Sawyer Cemetery, located just off Hoyt Rd. near the Franklin and Andover town lines at the head of Webster Lake, Merrimack County, New Hampshire; viewed and photographed by Linda Woodward Geiger in September 1991.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=554

Dec 23

Bible of Alfred H Brown

Bible belonging to Alfred H. BrownThe Sunday School Class taught by Alfred H. Brown presented him with a Bible. Unfortunately, a date of publication has not been located.

The family records are sparse containing marriage and birth information for Alfred H. Brown and Miss Lizzie Gale and the birth dates fo their four children. The Bible also presented the opportunity for place of sixteen photographs, but only twelve have survived. It would be logical for the images to be those of family and close relatives. None of the images carry identification. Could some of the individuals be members of the Sunday School class?

I present you scans of the pages and will hope that someone will be able to identify some of the people.

Bible belonging to Alfred H. Brown

Bible belonging to Alfred H. Brown

 

Bible belonging to Alfred H. Brown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bible belonging to Alfred H. Brown

Bible belonging to Alfred H. Brown

 

Bible belonging to Alfred H. Brown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Bible is in the possession of Linda Geiger, Big Canoe, Georgia.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=527

May 08

Postcard from 1886 Acknowledges Birth

Alice Margaret Brown was born in Canterbury, New Hampshire, 20 February 1886, to Alfred Hermon and Margaret Elizabeth (Gale) Brown. My sister recently found the postcard scanned for display here among some old papers of Nana Perkins (AM Brown). Although she is not named, the card obviously is in reference to her birthday three days prior to the date on the postmark of the postcard.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=484

Apr 04

1940 Census – Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire

1940 U.S. Census, Population Schedule, Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, Enumeration District 7-57, Sheet 3-A; downloaded from Archives.gov 3 April 2012.

The unincorporated area called Loudon Village was enumerated on 9 April 2012 by Wm. Joyce Medlock. My parents were listed with their respective parents. Their homes where on opposite sides of Main Street directly across from one another.

Family of Alice M. Perkins (Alice furnished the information)
Lines  18–20, household no. 42; Alice owned her home worth $3,000; in 1935 the family lived in the same house;
Household members (all born in New Hampshire): 1) Alice M. Perkins, head, age 54, widow, completed 4 years of high school; 2) Josephine E. Perkins, daughter, age 22, completed two years of college, and employed as an office attendant in a hospital; and 3) Alice M. Deprey, lodger, age 28, completed two years of college, and employed as a school teacher.
Family of Oscar H. Woodward (Sara Woodward furnished the information)
Lines 21–24, household no. 43; Oscar owned his home worth $3,000; in 1935 the family lived in Concord, Merrimack County, NH
Household members:1) Oscar H. Woodward, head; age 60, completed four years of high school, born in NH, and employed as a trackman for a steam railroad;  2) Sara M Woodward, wife, age 58, completed two years of high school, born in Nova Scotia; 3) Oscar H Woodward Jr, son, age 25, completed four hears of high school, born in NH, in 1935 he was in the U.S. Army, and employed as a truck driver; and 4) Jean M. Collins, lodger, age 15, completed 8 years of school, and born in NH.

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved.


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Nov 27

Seaver’s Saturday Night Challenge

The government structure of New England is unlike that of much of the United States. In that vain, I’ve taken a slight twist on Randy Seaver’s  “Saturday Night Fun Challenge” using Randy Majors’ website, http://randymajors.com/p/maps.html. My focus is on the town of Loudon, New Hampshire, rather than on Merrimack County within which Loudon, now lies.

Province of New Hampshire (now one of New England’s six states): On 18 September 1679, King Charles II made New Hampshire a royal colony separate from Massachusetts, but did not stipulate a western limit to its borders.[1]

New Hampshire Vermont Atlas of Historical County Boundaries*

Historical U.S. County Boundary Maps

1770 Effective Saturday, April 29, 1769, ROCKINGHAM created as one of five original counties

1773 Loudon in the province of New Hampshire
The first settlement was begun in 1761. Loudon, formerly a part of Canterbury, was incorporated on 28 January 1773,[2] and was within the jurisdiction of Rockingham County.

1780 Loudon, Rockingham County

1790 Loudon, Rockingham County

1800 Loudon, Rockingham County

1810 Loudon, Rockingham County

1820 Loudon, Rockingham County

1825 Effective 1 August 1823, Merrimack County was created from Hillsborough and Rockingham Counties.[3]

1830 Effective 24 December 1828, Merrimack County gained some area from Strafford when the town of Franklin was created from the towns of Andover, Northfield, Salisbury, and Sanbornton.

1830 Loudon, Merrimack County

1840 Loudon, Merrimack County

1850 Loudon, Merrimack County

1860 Loudon, Merrimack County

1870 Loudon, Merrimack County

1880 Loudon, Merrimack County

1890 Loudon, Merrimack County

1900 Loudon, Merrimack County

How do these boundaries affect my research?

Since vital records are under the jurisdiction of the town in New Hampshire, in addition to looking for records of births, marriage, and deaths for families know to have resided early in Loudon, I need to look at the records of Canterbury, since Loudon was formed from lands formerly in the town of Canterbury.

For probate and deed records for the families living in Loudon, prior to the formation of Merrimack County in December 1828, I need to look for the records in the county of Rockingham.


[1] T.J. Rand, coordinator of “Loudon, Merrimack County, New Hampshire,” NHGenWeb page http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nhmerrim/Loudon/ viewed 26 November 2011.

[2] Marcia D. Melnyk, Genealogist’s Handbook for New England Research, 4th edition (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), 150.

[3] Randy Majors, “Historical U.S. County Boundary Maps, ”http://randymajors.com/p/maps.html, viewed 26 November 2011.

* John H. Long, editor, New Hampshire Vermont Atlas of Historical County Boundaries (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993).  [A project of the Dr. William M. Scholl Center for Family and Community History: The Newberry Library.]

© Linda Woodward Geiger. All Rights Reserved

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.musingsbylinda.com/MyFamily/?p=368

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